Souvenir Shopping Guide: 15 Distinctly Swedish Products to Buy in Stockholm

Souvenir Shopping Guide: 15 Distinctly Swedish Products to Buy in Stockholm

If you come to Stockholm on the trail of Karlsson-on-the-Roof character (Swedish: Karlsson på taket), created by Astrid Lindgren, you're bound to enjoy yourself big time! Just don't forget to spare some time for gift shopping, so as to please your loved ones back home. In doing so, you may want to explore some major shopping destinations, like Västerlånggatan street (for shops: Kristallrummet at #21, Pasadena at #69, Iris at #24, K.U.S at #35, and Gamla Stans Konfektyrbutik at #26) or Österlånggatan street (for art, textiles and antiques). Alternatively, you can study this article and see for yourself what to look for and where to find it, before going.

1. Silver Crafts - Chunky, Bold and Minimalistic

Silver Crafts - Chunky, Bold and Minimalistic
The typically Swedish silver design in jewelry is bold, clean and chunky, with very little detail. Wide, hammered-flat bangles and collars are often plain or decorated with a very simple ornament or curve, or a modest semi-precious stone in a pastel shade. Silver is much loved in Sweden for its simplicity and grace, as opposed to the more precious and luxurious gold. Gold is considered somewhat demanding to wear, and sometimes a little bit ostentatious in a set or in eye-catching designs. Silver, in turn, is a perfect choice for the understated, simple and discrete elegance.
Silver is a very traditional metal for Sweden, produced here for centuries in the world-famous "Sala Silver Mine", once the largest source of income for the national economy and, as such, vigilantly guarded by The Crown. Thousands of people made their living in the mining industry. Four hundred years of Swedish silver production rendered this metal fairly inexpensive and affordable material for craftsmanship, jewelry-making and silversmithing.
The latter art is historically rooted in Sweden; there are internationally established hallmarks attesting to the silver quality and grade, along with individual trademarks of silversmiths and design companies.
Where to find it:
The silver birds and flower rings in the photo cost 50 -75 EUR and can be found at:

SVENSK SLÖJD (City)
Nybrogatan 23
114 39 Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-663 66 50
Open: 
Mon- Fri 10-18 (GMT +1)
Sat 11-16
Sun: Closed
http://www.svenskslojd.se/

Contemporary swedish silver can be found here:

NUTIDA SVENSKT SILVER

Arsenalsgatan 3
111 47 Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-611 67 18
Open
Tue - Fri 11.00 - 18.00 (GMT +1)
Sat: 12.00 - 16.00
http://www.nutida.nu/

Exclusive, trendy and expensive designer silver jewelry can be found at Efva Attling, Concept Store:
Prices range from high to extremely high, from 100 EUR to 10 000 EUR

EFVA ATTLING
Biblioteksgatan 14111 46 Stockholm
Telephone: +46 -8- 611 90 80
Open
Mon-Fri 10.00- 19.00
Sat: 10.00- 16.00
Sun: 12.00-16.00
http://www.efvaattling.com/

2. Swedish Handmade Clogs - Making Your Feet Dance

Swedish Handmade Clogs - Making Your Feet Dance
Contrary to what one may think, clogs in Sweden are not made for clog-dancing, although, indeed, they were used a lot in folk dancing back in the early 20th century. Historically, clogs were just a regular footwear, considered to be "poor man's shoes", worn mainly in the countryside by milkmaids and farmers. Nowadays, the clogs are used predominantly by nurses and other healthcare workers. The reason for that being the highly positive ergonomic effect of a wide, flat shoe, with a curved, heavy bottom - good for posture and providing relief to the back whilst ensuring correct, upright position of a body and the right foot-heel angle.
Typical Swedish clogs aren't fully made of wood, as opposed to their Dutch counterparts, but have a leather top with a small strap and a heavy, curved wooden cube bottom.
In the 1970s, clogs became fashionable again and today they enjoy major come-back, re-designed to contemporary styles by new fashion gurus. The young and trendy fashion label "Swedish Hasbeens" specializes in retro, vividly-colored clogs that have received massive attention from the fashion world in both Europe and the U.S.
Where to find it:
Crafted and painted clogs with flower decor (in photo):

SVENSK SLöJD (City)
Nybrogatan 23
114 39 Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-663 66 50
Open: 
Mon- Fri 10-18 (GMT +1)
Sat 11-16
Sun: Closed
http://www.svenskslojd.se/

The Knulp team make their own clogs and have custom sizes, as well as large size shoes for men (US size 12).
You can find traditionally hand made clogs in many shades of natural leather in this renowned craftsman shop:

KNULP (City)
Kungsgatan 53111 22 Stockholm
Open:
Mon- Fri 10.30-18.00 (closed13.30-14.00)Sat: 11.00-16.00
Telephone +46 - 8- 21 07 69
http://www.knulp.se/knulp.html

The 'Swedish Hasbeens' trendy and colorful shoes can be found at:

GRANDPA SöDER (SOUTH)
Södermannagatan 21
+46-8-643 60 80Open:
Mon- Fri 11.30 - 18.30 (GMT + 1)
Sat 11.30 - 17.00
Sun: 12.00 - 16.00
http://www.swedishhasbeens.com/index.php

3. Carved Wooden Utensils - Kitchen and Table

Carved Wooden Utensils - Kitchen and Table
Sweden's signature Nordic pale wood is used not only in furniture, cottage walls or interior decoration. There is an old tradition in Sweden to carve kitchen and house utensils out of a whole piece of wood. This includes pieces of furniture, as well as smaller items, such as blunt forks and plates for jars, miniature bowls for salt and wooden combs - all handmade (unlike, the set of juniper butter knifes available worldwide through Ikea, which is, of course, mass-produced and machine-made).
Wooden handcrafts are a typically Swedish cultural landmark; the most commonly used softwoods for that are Birch, Pine and Spruce. Rarely, they also apply harder to find and, therefore, more expensive Pearwood, which is thicker and more difficult to work with.
Wooden kitchen utensils, such as bowls, butter knives, carving boards and cutlery, carved or shaped by hand, are relatively inexpensive and easy to find at almost any mid-size shop in Stockholm selling home decor, porcelain or cutlery. The price range is low to modest, starting from EUR 2 for a butter knife or EUR 5 for a 3-piece cutlery set, to EUR 11 for a carving board. The variety of hand-carved knifes to choose from is enormous, featuring different shapes, shades of wood and handles (flat, round or oval), made either in one piece or with small wooden plugs to hold it together.
Where to find it:
IRIS (OLD TOWN)
Västerlånggatan 24
111 29  Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-698 09 73
Open:Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT +1)Sat 11.00-16.00 Sun 12.00-16.00

SVENSK SLÖJD(City)
Nybrogatan 23
114 39 Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-663 66 50
Open: 
Mon- Fri 10-18 (GMT +1)
Sat 11-16
Sun: Closed
http://www.svenskslojd.se/

4. Sámi Jewelry - Traditional and Unique

Sámi Jewelry - Traditional and Unique
The Sámi are indigenous people of Sweden and the northernmost parts of Finland and Norway. They have their own parliament and political system, although they do abide by the Swedish law. The traditional Samí handcrafts and jewelry are easily recognizable and unique. The colors used in their handmade jewelry and textiles are often representative of the Samí flag - dark blue, bright red, grass green and golden yellow.
The Samí bracelets are made out of braided silver or pewter thread, placed inside and atop a flat leather string, and fastened with a small button carved out of bone. The metal threads are hard to braid, and just one inch of braiding take hours to complete. The bracelets are historically rooted in the Sámi culture, and are meant to last for life, or at least for many years until the leather wears out and needs to be changed. The leather comes from Caribou (Reindeer) and so does the button, carved out of Caribou antler. The patterns are single, double or quadruple rows of thread, sometimes with miniature knots or pearls of metal. There is a full range of sizes, and the bracelets can be wide or narrow in style.
Price vary within the EUR 40-55 range.
Where to find it:
IRIS (OLD TOWN)
Västerlånggatan 24
111 29  Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-698 09 73
Open:Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT +1)Sat 11.00-16.00 Sun 12.00-16.00

SWEDEN OF STOCKHOLM (Old Town)

Österlångatan 1
111 31 StockholmTelephone +46-8-601 00 06
Open Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT + 1)
Sat 11.00 - 17.00
Sun: Closed

5. Dalecarlian Horse - Possibly Best-Known Red Horse in the World

Dalecarlian Horse - Possibly Best-Known Red Horse in the World
Perhaps the best-known of all the Swedish artifacts, the Dalecarlian or Dala Horse is originally carved in wood and hand-painted in the Swedish county of Dalarna. With its distinct brick-red color and hand-painted pattern, the horse has become a sort of Swedish trademark. Nowadays, it is available in many other materials as well, including crystal, ceramics or glass.
The kurbits pattern painted on the horse is typical of Dalarna county, located in the very heart of Sweden. The original copies of Dala horses are made only in one village, Nusnäs, and are painted brick-red. Other colors, such as white or blue, although approved, are not considered traditional. In fact, the very first Dala horses produced were not colored at all, as they appeared before the brick-red paint was manufactured. The price on the horses ranges from EUR 11 for small copies (7 cm) up to EUR 42 for larger ones (17-20 cm).
Where to find it:
NORDIC MUSEUM GIFT SHOP (only offer genuine swedish quality items)
NORDIC MUSEUM
Djurgårdsvägen 6-16
115 93 Stockholm
Telephone: 08-519 546 26
Open Mon- Sun 10.00- 17.00 (GMT +1)

Dalecarlian horse inside a crystal cube:

SWEDEN OF STOCKHOLM (Old Town)

Österlångatan 1
111 31 StockholmTelephone +46-8-601 00 06
Open Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT + 1)
Sat 11.00 - 17.00
Sun: Closed

6. Quality Crystalware

Quality Crystalware
Crystal statues, figurines and vases in Sweden are made by a few well-known, high-quality manufacturers. The most famous factory brands are Orrefors, Kosta Boda and Mats Jonasson Målerås, all of which can be found represented by some statement pieces in selected stores internationally, beside the main showroom boutiques in Stockholm and factory on-site outlets in various parts of Sweden.
These crystal statues portrait faces of mystery and are created by the established label Mats Jonasson Målerås, the third largest maker of crystal in Sweden. The masques are named after mythological characters, such as 'Morgana', 'Dafne' and 'Batzeba'. Another world-renowned label, Kosta Boda, specializes in making superb crystal objects. Their pieces of crystal with a Dalecarlian horse inside are available in a variety of stores countrywide.
Photo: 'Masq' - limited edition crystal statues by Mats Jonasson Målerås
Prices:
Dalecarlian horse in crystal, EUR 40
Crystal mystery masque, face, EUR 100
Large massive crystal vase Kosta Boda, EUR 2-300
Where to find it:
SWEDEN OF STOCKHOLM (Old Town)
Österlångatan 1
111 31 StockholmTelephone +46-8-601 00 06
Open Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT + 1)
Sat 11.00 - 17.00
Sun: Closed

7. Brushes Bound by Hand - for a Greater Cause

Brushes Bound by Hand - for a Greater Cause
Brushes, brooms and whisks, sold at the Iris store, are all made by hand by members of the visually impaired people society. Each strand and thread is hand-crafted, and the wooden handles have the 'handicraft' branding engraved upon. The Iris chain of boutiques has a 100-year tradition of selling these handicrafts on behalf of the visually impaired society, and all proceeds from the sales of these items go to the people who create them. The sold here brightly colored dish cloths of textile are all hand-colored. From small, round brushes for dish-washing to full-size floor brooms (made of dried birch) to the softer, smaller whisks for clothes to bath brushes with a longer handle, there is a brush for every household need. The woods used for making these brushes are oak, birch and ash, and the fibers are the carefully treated horsehair (mane and tail).
The prices range from EUR 3-6 for smaller brushes to about EUR 20-40 for brooms and larger items.
NOTE: The Iris stores also stock and sell some imported goods from France, such as soaps and lavender. Read labels on shelf.
Where to find it:
IRIS (OLD TOWN)
Västerlånggatan 24
111 29  Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-698 09 73
Open:Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT +1)Sat 11.00-16.00 Sun 12.00-16.00

IRIS (CITY)
Kungsgatan 55
112 22 Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-21 47 26Open:Mon - Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT +1)Sat: 10.00-15.00
Sunday: Closed

8. Sámi Traditional Crafts - 'Duodji'

Sámi Traditional Crafts - 'Duodji'
The Sámi people of Sweden have their own traditional craftsmanship, called Duodjí, which is passed down through generations for centuries. The Sámi-produced items are always marked with a symbol of authenticity, and have great practical use: water bowl carved out of birch, water flask made of leather, a knife sheath or spoon carved out of a bone, small engraved boxes for sewing equipment - to name but a few. Leather pouches with bone pearls and leather tassels are typical, much as the simple ornaments, such as zigzag line or flower shape. Geometric shapes, similar to runes, are also common. The Duodji trade is protected by government as a cultural heritage, and requires official approval for obtaining a quality hallmark. The latter represents a colored circle (dark red, green, yellow and blue) with the words 'Samí Duodji' within.
Each piece of Sámi craft takes enormous number of hours to make, be it carving out of wood or bone, processing leather all the way from skinning the animal, or braiding bracelets with silver or pewter thread (taking at least 10 hours to complete). This is why the price on each such item is very high, considering the amount of hard work involved and exclusivity of the product. A small knife with a bone handle costs EUR 500, a large knife EUR 900, and a small leather pouch EUR 200.
The original Sámi handicrafts are sold by a handful of shops in Stockholm, as the artists prefer selling the work themselves, in person. You will find genuine Sámi Duodji products in these shops:
Where to find it:
PASADENA (OLD TOWN)
Västerlångg. 69 111 29 STOCKHOLM
Telephone +46- 8 -14 94 60
Open:
Week days: Regular business hours (unspecified)
Sunday: Closed
http://www.pasadena.se/site/se/foretagsinfo.html

SVENSK HEMSLöJD
Norrlandsgatan 20
111 43 Stockholm 
Telephone: +46-8-23 21 15
Open:
Mon - Fri 10.00-18.00Sat 11.00 – 16.00
Sun: Closed
http://www.svenskhemslojd.com/

9. Wild Forest Berry Jam and Marmalade

Wild Forest Berry Jam and Marmalade
From the Swedish folktale of Elsa Beskow to the luxury department stores selling exclusive organic berries, the harvest of the deep, Nordic forest is truly a tasteful encounter with pure natural flavors. Hard to come by and impossible to grow in greenhouses, the tiny fruits of the forest will always be a joy for the senses with the bright colors and delightful, sweet to almost sour taste. The Lingonberry is perfect as a side dish to game meat and porridge, but also in lemonade and jam. The Cloudberry with the sweet, honey-like taste and a little, almost unnoticeable touch of sour, is loved in desserts, with ice-cream and as rich marmalade. The Blueberry, perhaps the most loved, is the all-round flavor, found in tea, desserts, lemonade, extracts, eaten with pancakes or sprinkled over a bowl of milk or yogurt.
The traditional jams and marmalades in Sweden are made from wild growing Lingonberry, Blueberry and the legendary Cloudberry, known as 'the Nordic gold'. The Cloudberry only grows in the forests of the northern parts of the country, and is rather rare and hard to harvest. The harvest season is late summer to late autumn, during which you can also find the golden Chanterelle mushrooms hiding in the deep layers of dewy moss.
Lingonberry, Blueberry and Cloudberry jam is served for breakfast and used in desserts, but also as an addition to dishes made from game animals, such as moose, deer, elk and hare. The price range is modest, from EUR 4-12 where EUR 12 is charged for the more exclusive hand-decorated jars of Cloudberry. Lingonberry and Blueberry generally cost about half that of Cloudberry.
The wild forest berries are also considered super-health foods, because of the high concentration of antioxidants, flavonoids and vitamins.
Where to find it:
Traditional jams and marmalades from the quality label P&B can be found in the two well known food market malls:

Name: Hötorgshallen (The 'Hötorget Halls', City Center: Food court and deli market)
Hötorgshallen, Hötorget (Square)
11157 Stockholm

Söderhallarna ('Southern Halls', food court and deli market)
Medborgarplatsen (Square)
118 72 Stockholm

http://www.pobdelikatess.com/

10. Wooly and Cosy Sweaters - Hand-Knitted Socks, Mittens and Cardigans

Wooly and Cosy Sweaters - Hand-Knitted Socks, Mittens and Cardigans
It might be just the best material to keep us warm, that smooth, fluffy fur harvested in tons from our curly little friends, the sheep. The gusty winds and freezing winter temperatures, rainy, snowy and icy weather of Scandinavia call for serious attire. And what can be better than wearable, cosy wool garments to keep our hands, feet and body warm during the blistering cold winter months. Wool garments are indispensable in the Stockholm harsh winter climate, and the sweaters made in Sweden are often hand-knitted in a traditional style. Wool is also used widely to make socks, hats, scarves, pullovers, and mittens. Naturally, there is also a wide range of knitted wool plaids, blankets and pillowcases to be found, often at the same stores that offer handmade wool garments.
The patterns applied to knitted wool items usually involve one base color and one contrasting color, and often represent a jacquard pattern featuring stylized flowers, dots or snowflakes, diamond shapes or even outlined elks. The classic Lovikka mitten is a great example of such tradition, with the thick, off-white wool and the contrasting color lines in a simple, but striking combination.
Where to find it:
Price of wool sweaters in photo 80-140 € (80€ is about 110$) from the shop:

SVENSK SLÖJD
Nybrogatan 23
114 39 Stockholm
Open: mon-fri 10-18
Sat 11-16
Telephone: +46 (0)8-663 66 50

11. Linen Woven by Hand

Linen Woven by Hand
If you think of linen as some wrinkly pajamas and mousy table cloths, forget it! The recently fashionable, eco-friendly garments in the shades of off-white and pale grey brown, as well as rustic pillow-cases, heavy bedspreads and curtains have proven that linen is widely appreciated these days for its lasting quality fiber and rich texture. In Stockholm, you are guaranteed to find some sort of linen fabric in most any home, either in inherited older styles or new designs, fresh from high-end boutiques.
The traditional, old-fashioned linen is uncolored, or colored in plain, mild, mostly earth tones. Linen is long-lasting and robust, and often has visible threads of fiber.
The history of creating fine and coarse linen fabric in Sweden goes back hundreds of years, and largely precedes the arrival of cotton in the 19th century. Prior to that, linen was the main fabric used for most weaved products, such as clothes, tapestry, bed linen, towels, pillows, napkins and other household cloths.
Today, the traditional Swedish linen is used mainly for making clothes or home decor items, such as curtains or pillows. It is usually eco-friendly and grown and processed in a sustainable way. The prices vary from medium to high. Linen clothes can be very expensive, if made completely organic and sewn by hand. Clothes range in price from EUR 50 upwards, and textiles from EUR 20 up to about EUR 100. Very large or complex items are more expensive.
Where to find it:
Clothes designer label K.U.S has two Stockholm shops:

K.U.S
Västerlånggatan 35, Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-21 13 60
Open: Mon - Fri 10.30 - 18.30 (GMT +1)
Sat 10.30 - 17.00
Sun 12.00 - 16.00

K.U.S
St Paulsgatan 1, Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-694 93 00
Open: Mon - Fri 11.00 - 18.30 (GMT +1)
Sat 11.00 - 16.00
Sun 12.00 - 16.00
http://kusdesign.jetshop.se/

Linen fabric home decor items can be found at:

Name: Svenska Inredningsbolaget (Showroom)

Högbergsgatan 66C
118 54 Stockholm Telephone, cellphone: +46-76-7665656
Open: Unspecified hours for the showroom, by appointment, call first

STRÖMBERGS
Sibyllegatan 22, Stockholm
Open: Mon- 14.00- 18.00 (GMT+1)
Tues - Fri 11.00- 18.00
Sat 11.00- 15.00
Sunday: Closed
http://www.swedishness.com/produkter/

12. Swedish Licorice and Chocolate - the Sweet Tooth is Asking for Hand-Made Pralines

Swedish Licorice and Chocolate - the Sweet Tooth is Asking for Hand-Made Pralines
According to statistics, the Swedes have the sweetest tooth on the planet, consuming annually a staggering 17 kilos of candies per person, mostly chocolate and licorice. Speaking of the latter, sweet licorice comes 2nd on the Swedes' consumption list to their all-time favorite - salty licorice, which is something other Europeans - except, perhaps, for the Finns - often find a bit unusual, if not repulsive. Production of licorice in Sweden is done by several small-size manufacturers, and it's sold at specialized chocolateries and coffee shops. In Stockholm, you can find these shops almost anywhere, but beware of the ones located inside or close by to subway stations; they sell only the imported, poor-quality stuff.
Swedish chocolate is made in small batches, decorated mostly by hand. The most common flavors include sweet almond nougat or toffee, covered in creamy, sugary milk or white chocolate, as well as more sober mixes, featuring dark, rich in cocoa chocolate that is almost bitter. The best-known Swedish chocolate brand, Marabou, produces super-sweet milk chocolate, available at any grocery store around the country. A true chocolate connoisseur, however, would not even consider it real chocolate, because of the low content of cocoa-butter. Luckily, at the Chocolate Factory, Stockholm's "chocolate paradise," one can choose from a variety of the finest quality pralines, selecting each piece separately. And whilst there, why not enjoy a cup of steaming hot cocoa to ease the decision-making process.
Where to find it:
CHOKLAD & LAKRITS Sankt Eriksgatan 99, Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-210 210 Open
Mon--Fri 12.00 -18.00 (GMT +1)
Sat 12.00-16.00
http://butiken.chokladbutiken.se/

CHOKLADFABRIKEN (City) ('Chocolate Factory')
Regeringsgatan 58, 111 56 Stockholm
Telephone +46-8-640 05 68
Open
Mon-Fri 10.00-18.30
Sat: 10.00 -17.00
Sun: Closed
http://www.chokladfabriken.com/coffeeshop/

13. Home-Made Candy Canes - Mint White and Red Stripes

Home-Made Candy Canes - Mint White and Red Stripes
The Swedish town of Graenna (Gränna) is famous for the locally-made candy canes, called 'Polka pigs' ('Polkagrisar') in local dialect. This snug little town is also known for growing and harvesting tons of fruit, mostly apples. The distinct smell of caramel and mint fills the air in the summer, when hundreds of pounds of sweets are mixed, stirred and boiled to be later shaped, by hand, into canes, caramels and lollipops.
The original flavors include white peppermint and strawberry caramel, although other flavors, like licorice, raspberry and violet, are also approved. The actual candies come as round bars, the traditional shape, or as canes, caramels in a jar, or lollipops in all imaginable sizes. The normal price for a standard-size cane (80 grams) is EUR 3 and EUR 20 for 15 smaller canes (50 grams each).
Where to find it:
Polkapojkarna (Old Town)
Gamla Stans Polkagriskokeri AB
Lilla Nygatan 10111 28 Stockholm
Telephone +46 -8-107182
Open
Tue- Sat: 11.00-18.00
Sunday 11.00-16.00

http://www.gamlastanspolkagriskokeri.se/

14. Soft and Curly Lambskins for Fireplace

Soft and Curly Lambskins for Fireplace
The island of Gotland is not only a vacation spot for Stockholm residents, but also a destination much famous for its curly lambs providing furs and wool for the much needed in Sweden, particularly in cold winter months, sweaters, slippers, mittens and hats. If you take a bike ride across the island in summer on a popular trail, chances are that you will have to stop, at least once, to give way to a herd of sheep crossing the road en route to the waterfront or the nearby meadow for grazing.
Gotland sheep are raised as free-range animals, grazing outside most of the year; their skins are processed the old farmer's way. The lamb fur is grey, curly and shiny. The most popular items on sale are whole sheepskins (ideal for rolling out in front of a fireplace), a pair of mittens with the fur-side in, or a grey-and-black patterned hand-knitted sweater made from lambswool. The prices vary from EUR 15 for a knitted hat, EUR 20-30 for a pair of fur gloves, EUR 25-45 for a curly lambskin pillow, to EUR 150-250 for a large lambskin fur.
Where to find it:
Name of shop: SinneMinne
Österlånggatan 41111 31 Stockholm
Telephone: +46-8-411 35 31
Open
Mon- Fri: 11.00 - 18.00 (GMT +1)
Sat: 11.00 - 16.00
Sunday: Closed
http://www.sinneminne.com/index.html

15. Ceramics - Shiny or Matte Decor in Classic Design

Ceramics - Shiny or Matte Decor in Classic Design
Shiny 'Höganäs' plates, both modern and classic, created by Swedish designer Örjan Johansson, are available in high-gloss red or black varnish and several sizes. Pottery manufacturer Höganäs is popular in Stockholm, as well as nationwide, for the supreme quality and timeless design of its products, and the label itself has become a pottery icon for several generations of Swedes.
The small municipality of Höganäs has been a home to traditional ceramics manufacture for over a century and was even mentioned in the world famous book "Natives of Hemsö" by August Strindberg in 1887.
The traditional lineup of Höganäs products includes high-quality ceramic stoneware pots and plates, of which the most well known decor is the old fashioned pale gray with dark blue details, or dark, almost black brown. These ceramic items were made to last for decades and older pieces from this brand are now collectible items, often inherited from past generations. The ceramic pots and vases from the 1950s are especially desirable among ceramic collectors and antiques dealers. Prices vary between EUR 10 for small plates and EUR 16 for larger ones. Tea mugs go for EUR 10-16 with a wooden plate. Pots are EUR 30 and up.
Where to find it:
SWEDEN OF STOCKHOLM (Old Town)
Österlångatan 1
111 31 StockholmTelephone +46-8-601 00 06
Open Mon- Fri 10.00-18.00 (GMT + 1)
Sat 11.00 - 17.00
Sun: Closed
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Stockholm Walking Tours

Djurgården Museums Walk

Djurgården Museums Walk

With almost 70 museums in operation, Stockholm houses more museums than almost any other city on the planet. The island of Djurgården, inside Stockholm, is home to an array of museums and historic monuments, including Scandinavia’s most popular Vasa Museum and Sweden’s first open-air museum. To explore these and other museums of Djurgården in detail, follow this self-guided walk.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.3 km
Gamla Stan Walk, Part 2

Gamla Stan Walk, Part 2

Gamla stan (The Old Town) is the oldest part of Stockholm, officially known until 1980 as “The Town Between Bridges” (Staden mellan broarna). Established in the 13th century, the area abounds in medieval alleyways, cobbled streets, and archaic architecture, showing a great deal of North German influence. Among the many places of interest found here are The Stockholm Stock Exchange (built originally between 1773 and 1778), The Bonde Palace (arguably, the most prominent monument of the Swedish Empire period), and The House of Nobility (keeping records and acts of the Swedish nobility). Follow this guide to see Stockholm the way it used to be back in the old days!

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.1 km
Norrmalm Cultural Walk, Part 2

Norrmalm Cultural Walk, Part 2

Once an independent city, Norrmalm has been a part of Stockholm (one of its central areas, these days) since 1635. Many of Norrmalm's old buildings were torn down during the 1950s-60s to clear space for modern construction. Still, the most notable pieces of local architecture are in place and reveal a wide range of styles - Late Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque. The district is a home to The Royal Swedish Opera, The Medelhavsmuseet (Mediterranean Museum) and Moderna Museet (modern and contemporary art museum) hosting one of the richest modern art collections in the world. To see these and other places of interest of the Swedish capital, follow this guide and enjoy!

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.8 km

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