Architectural Tour in Istanbul, Istanbul

Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Saperaud
This self-guided walking tour is included in the iOS app " City Maps and Walks (470+ Cities)" in iTunes and the Android app "Istanbul Map and Walks" in Google Play.

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Istanbul can offer its visitors quite an unforgettable experience when it comes to architecture. Here you can admire both the architectural achievements of the long vanished Eastern Roman Empire and its influence and the traditional Ottoman-Arabic style. Take this tour to see some of the best examples these architectural styles.

Walk Route

Guide Location: Turkey » Istanbul
Guide Type: Self-guided city tour
# of Attractions: 8
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.2 km
Author: kane

1) Fatih Mosque

The Fatih Camii translates to the “Conqueror’s Mosque” from the Turkish language. The Fatih Mosque is one of the largest examples of Turkish-Islamic architecture in Istanbul, and it was built over the original site of the Church of the Holy Apostles. It is an Ottoman Mosque, located in the Fatih district.

Constructed during 1462- 1470 by Sultan Fatih Mehmet (Mehmet the Conqueror), the Fatih Mosque is distinct in its construction. It consists of a hospital, a caravansary, kitchens, a...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Muscol

2) Şehzade Mosque

The Şehzade Cammi translates to the Prince Mosque from the Turkish language. This is an Ottoman Imperial mosque located in the Fatih district in Istanbul.

Sultan Suleiman I commissioned the mosque in memory of his son, Prince Mehmet, who died at the age of 21 of small pox. Hence the name of the mosque - Sehzade, or Prince. It was completed in 1548, and was the first major commission of the Imperial Architect Mimar Sinan. The mosque is still considered by historians as the first masterpiece...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Darwinek

3) Bodrum Mosque

Formally known as “The Church of the Monastery of Myrelaion” or “The Place of Myrrah”, the Bodrum Mosque used to be a cross-in-square designed church in Istanbul. Bodrum translates as “basement” from Turkish, and this probably refers to the crypt that is still present beneath the mosque. The church was converted into a mosque by Ottoman Grand Vizier, Mesih Pasa, in 1500.

The mosque was damaged by fire in 1784 and 1911 and it was also abandoned for some time, until the Istanbul...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and A. Fabbretti

4) Süleymaniye Mosque

The Süleymaniye Mosque is a 16th century mosque built by Suleiman “The Magnificent” in Istanbul in 1557. The mosque was built by the famous Imperial Architect Mimar Sinan. The mosque is modeled in part on the Hagia Sofia, and in part on a Byzantine Basilica, in order to reflect the grandeur of the city’s past architectural monuments.

In 1660, the Süleymaniye Mosque was ravaged by fire, and was restored by Mehmet IV. The restoration work was commissioned by the architect Fossati....
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Johann H. Addicks

5) Beyazıt Tower

The Beyazıt Tower is an old fire tower made of stone that was built in the year 1828. It stands at the site of the old wooden fire towers, made during the ancient times, which were actually swallowed up by flames. The 85 meter high tower stands in the old quarter of Istanbul, and it is still used today as a fire tower.

Before Aga Huseyin Pasa built a stone fire tower in 1828, two wooden fire towers had already been destroyed by flames. The tower can be visited by tourists, but a special...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Gryffindor

6) Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia means “Holy Wisdom” in Greek. This monumental structure was once an Orthodox patriarchal Basilica, then a mosque, and now, finally, is a Museum in the city of Istanbul. It was built in the fourth century by Constantine the Great as a Church, and it has seen much of the changing ruling powers of Istanbul ever since.

Many people mistake it as being dedicated to Saint Sofia, but the church was originally dedicated to the second person of the Holy Trinity, and its full Greek name...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Gokhan

7) Fountain of Ahmed III

The Fountain of Ahmed III is also known as the Ahmet Çeşmesi in Turkish. The fountain is located in front of the Imperial Gate of the great Topkapı Palace in Istanbul at the site of an older Byzantine fountain called Perayton. The fountain is a Turkish rococo structure. The fountain of Sultan Ahmed III was built in 1728 under Ottoman sultan Ahmed III. During the Ottoman period, it was a very popular gathering place and social center.

The fountains architecture is a combination of...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and KureCewlik81

8) Topkapi Palace

The Topkapi Palace is usually number one on the list of places to visit in Istanbul for most tourists. This grand palace was the official residence of the Ottoman Sultans for almost 400 years and ever since 1985, the palace is also a UNESCO world heritage site.

The Topkapi Palace is built on a huge scale with four court yards and a Harem, and each location in the Palace houses incredible displays of Islamic art, holy relics and history. The most prized collection is that of the Islamic relics...
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Gryffindor


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