City Orientation Tour of Savannah, Savannah

City Orientation Tour of Savannah, Savannah
Image Courtesy of Flickr and taberandrew
This self-guided walking tour is included in the iOS app "Savannah Map and Walks" on iTunes App Store and the Android app "Savannah Map and Walks" on Google Play.
iOS City Maps and Walks app   Android City Maps and Walks app
The city of Savannah was established in 1733 as the colonial capital of the Province of Georgia and later as the first state capital of Georgia. Savannah attracts millions of tourists who come for the city's architecture and historic buildings: the Old Fort Jackson (the oldest standing fort in Georgia), the First African Baptist Church and many others. Don't miss the chance to discover modern Savannah and her past, as reflected in her Historic Districts and other interesting places to visit!

City Orientation Tour of Savannah - Route Map

Guide Name: City Orientation Tour of Savannah
Guide Location: USA » Savannah
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 11
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.5 km
Author: hollyg
Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum

1) Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum

Savannah, Georgia, is an area with a rich and fascinating history in the civil rights movement. The Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum is named after Dr. Ralph Mark Gilbert, a major figure in Georgia's civil rights history, and pastor of the First African Baptist Church. In the year 1942, Gilbert organized Savannah's branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and has been referred to as the “father of Savannah's modern day Civil Rights...   view more
Image Courtesy of Katie Mahon
Forsyth Park

2) Forsyth Park

Forsyth Park was created in the mid-19th century, and has become Savannah's largest and most active park. It covers an area of around twenty acres, and has done so for the last hundred and sixty years. While many other areas of Savannah have seen heavy development and urbanization, Savannah's people have worked hard to maintain historic Forsyth Park.

Forsyth Park is best known for its number of monuments to historic figures, including a monument created for the people killed during...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and Photo Denbow
Sight description based on wikipedia
Mrs. Wilkes Boarding House

3) Mrs. Wilkes Boarding House

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room is a restaurant offering Southern home cooking in Savannah, Georgia. The restaurant was run for several decades by Sema Wilkes, from 1943 until her death in 2002. Her family continues to run the restaurant today. Mrs. Wilkes' is noted for its homestyle traditions, in which guests are escorted in shifts into the dining room, where a variety of dishes are already on the table (no menu; items are selected by the restaurant). The guests sit at the table and pass...   view more
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Jimbo Wales
Sight description based on wikipedia
Green-Meldrim House

4) Green-Meldrim House

Savannah's Green-Meldrim House is one of many historic houses in the city. Built circa 1853 for cotton merchant Charles Green, the Gothic revival style Green-Meldrin House is notable for being a beautifully restored old house, and for playing a key part in Civil War history. Originally, the home was the most expensive 19th century house in Savannah. Many of its original interior survives, including the marble mantles, black walnut woodwork on the first floor, crown moldings, chandeliers,...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and kmf164
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

5) Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

In the early days of America, Roman Catholics were prohibited from settling in the South, out of fear that they would become more loyal to the Spanish southern colonies, and move away from the English northern colonies. As a result, Savannah had no Catholic church until the Revolution. The first Catholic church in Savannah was created in 1799, by French migrants from Haiti who were fleeing the French Revolution, and various local uprisings. In 1873, the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist was...   view more
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and Shell Kinney
Sight description based on wikipedia
Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace

6) Juliette Gordon Low's Birthplace

Juliette Gordon Low is best known as the woman who first organized the Girl Scouts in 1912, after meeting war hero Robert Baden-Powell. Always an energetic, happy woman, Low was known for jumping headfirst into new hobbies and interests. After her historic meeting with Baden-Powell, where she learned about the Girl Guides in England, Low returned inspired to bring the girl's scouting movement to Savannah, Georgia, and America beyond.

The building itself is a blend of Regency and...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and dbking
Telfair Museum of Art

7) Telfair Museum of Art

Telfair Museum of Art has the distinction of being the south's first public art museum. The museum opened in 1886, at the bequest of Mary Telfair. The building itself is the old Telfair family's mansion. Telfair square actually houses three buildings- the building holding the Telfair Museum of Art (known as the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences), the Owens-Thomas House, and the Jepson Center for the Arts, designed by Moshe Safdie.

The Telfair Museum of Art houses nearly 5,000...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and Photography by J.Campbell
First African Baptist Church

8) First African Baptist Church

The First African Baptist Church has the distinction of being descended from the first black Baptist congregation in North America, stemming from a church founded in 1773. A slave, George Leile, was the first black man to be ordained by Baptists to preach in Georgia. He originally preached to slaves on plantations in the area, until he fled to a British-controlled area of the colonies during the Revolutionary War to secure his freedom. He was joined by another man, Andrew Bryan, and his wife....   view more
Image Courtesy of Wikimedia and KudzuVine
Olde Pink House Restaurant

9) Olde Pink House Restaurant

If you want to have a lunch or dinner in Savannah, you can't find a better place to dine at than the Olde Pink House Restaurant. It's considered a local treasure. With antiques, ancestral paintings and fireplaces, guests can enjoy the formidable Southern cuisine in...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and TheatricAL 03
Owens-Thomas House

10) Owens-Thomas House

The Owens-Thomas house is, like the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Jepson Center for the Arts, a museum building perated by the Telfair Museum of Art.

The building itself was designed by William Jay, and English architect who was among the first professionally-trained architects working in the U.S. The residence was finished in 1819 for Richard Richardson and his family, who earned their money as cotton merchants and bankers. Unfortunately, their prosperity was short-lived-...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and Puggles
The Pirate's House

11) The Pirate's House

The Pirate's House is a tavern and restaurant thought to be the oldest building still standing in all of Georgia. It wasn't always a tavern, though- the building was originally created to house the gardener that worked on Savannah's botanical garden in 1734. When the botanical garden was deemed unnecessary by 1754, the gardener's building (dubbed the Herb House) was reinvented as an inn for visiting seamen and traders.

Over time, the building attracted the criminal...   view more
Image Courtesy of Flickr and Photo Denbow

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