Wallenstein Palace, Prague

Wallenstein Palace, Prague (must see)

The first baroque building in Prague, the Wallenstein Palace was commissioned by the 1st Count Wallenstein in the 17th century. The count was a vain man and he wanted his palace to rival Prague Castle; he had to raze over twenty houses to get enough land to install his palace and gardens.

The interior of the palace is richly decorated; the stuccowork depicts battle trophies, weapons and musical instruments. In the Audience Hall, a wonderful fresco depicts Vulcan at work over his forge and the walls of the Astrological Corridor are covered in astrological motifs. The most amazing room in the palace is the enormous Knight’s Hall which is two storeys high and the ceiling fresco shows the count as Mars the Roman God of war in his chariot.

The palace is now the seat of the Czech Republic Senate and is only open to the public on weekends, but it is worth visiting on any day of the week, just to wander through the magnificent gardens that are full of formal flower beds, bronze statues of heroes from Greek mythology and ornamental ponds. One curiosity is the 'Grotesquery' or Dripstone wall, which represents a limestone grotto, complete with stalactites. There is also an aviary full of owls and peacocks. Entrance to the palace and gardens is free of charge.

At the bottom of the garden, opposite the palace, is the old riding school which now houses Modern Art exhibitions. Concerts are held in the gardens in the spring and summer. The palace chapel has frescos dedicated to St Wenceslas and the palace itself is said to be haunted by the ghost of a headless bell ringer.

Why You Should Visit:
Beautiful building with beautifully maintained grounds, as well as a space where gifts from representatives of other countries are exhibited.

Tip:
You may only visit the Palace on weekends; however, entrance is free.

Opening Hours:
Sat-Sun: 10am-5pm
Sight description based on wikipedia

This sight is featured in a self-guided walking tour of Prague, Czech Republic within the mobile app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" which can be downloaded from iTunes App Store or Google Play. Please download the app to your mobile phone or tablet for travel directions for visiting this sight. The app turns your mobile device to a personal tour guide and it works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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Wallenstein Palace on Map

Sight Name: Wallenstein Palace
Sight Location: Prague, Czech Republic
Sight Type: Attraction/Landmark
Guide(s) containing this sight: Mala Strana Walking Tour  

Walking Tours in Prague, Czech Republic

Create Your Own Walk in Prague

Create Your Own Walk in Prague

Creating your own self-guided walk in Prague is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Josefov Nightlife

Josefov Nightlife

Prague offers fascinating night entertainment. It has a lot of clubs and discos. Check out the most popular nightlife spots in Central Prague in the following self-guided tour.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.6 km
Mala Strana Walking Tour

Mala Strana Walking Tour

Malá Strana ("Little Quarter") is a district in Prague, one of the most historically significant in the city. Back in the Middle Ages, it was predominantly populated by ethnic Germans and, in later years, largely retained Germanic influence, despite prevalence of the Baroque style in architecture. The most prominent landmark of Malá Strana is the Wallenstein Palace. There are also a...  view more

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.5 km
Stare Mesto Souvenir Shopping

Stare Mesto Souvenir Shopping

It would be a pity to leave Prague without having explored its specialty shops and bringing home something truly original. We've compiled a list of gifts and souvenirs, which are unique to Prague, that a visitor might like to purchase to reflect their visit.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.0 km
Nove Mesto Walking Tour

Nove Mesto Walking Tour

Nové Město (“New Town” in Czech) is a district in Prague, the youngest (est. 1348) and the largest (three times the size of the Old Town) of the five originally independent townships that form today's historic center of the Czech capital. The area bears great historic significance and is traditionally dense with tourists. Among the attractions found here are the Dancing House (named so...  view more

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.2 km
Stare Mesto Museums Tour

Stare Mesto Museums Tour

There are many renowned historical and contemporary museums in Prague. They are usually located in old palaces that are monuments themselves. You can get the feel of the past and present of the Czech Republic while visiting some of the following museums in Staré Město area of Prague.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
Hradcany Walk

Hradcany Walk

Hradčany, or the Castle District, is an area in Prague surrounding the Prague Castle. The latter is said to be the biggest castle in the world (measuring some 570 meters long and approximate 130 meters wide). Going back in history as far as the 9th century, the castle has been the seat of power for Bohemian kings, Holy Roman emperors, leaders of Czechoslovakia and is currently the official...  view more

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.9 km

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