Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour II, Paris

This is part 2 of the 1st arrondissement tour of Paris exploring one of the smallest and oldest districts of the French capital, home to some of Paris's major landmarks, as well as business and administration offices . This itinerary includes Pavillon de Flore, Tuileries Gardens, Musée de l'Orangerie and many other prominent sights.
You can follow this self-guided walking tour to explore the attractions listed below. How it works: download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

Download The GPSmyCity App

Download 'GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities' app for IOS   Download 'GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities' app for Android

Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour II Map

Guide Name: Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour II
Guide Location: France » Paris (See other walking tours in Paris)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 10
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.6 km
Author: karen
1
Musée de l'Orangerie

1) Musée de l'Orangerie (must see)

The Musée de l'Orangerie is an art gallery of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings located on the Place de la Concorde in Paris. It contains works by Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Rousseau, Chaim Soutine, Alfred Sisley, and Maurice Utrillo among others. The gallery is on the bank of the Seine in the old orangery of the Tuileries Palace on the Place de la Concorde near the Concorde metro station.

A cycle of Monet's water-lily paintings, known as the Nympheas, was arranged on the ground floor of the Orangerie in 1927. The museum has housed the Walter-Guillaume collection of impressionist paintings since 1965. The Orangerie was renovated in order to move the paintings to the upper floor of the gallery. They are now available under direct diffused light as was originally intended by Monet.

Why You Should Visit:
Although the highlight here is a panorama of Monet's water lilies, there is plenty of first-rate artwork in the basement, too.

Tip:
Go to the l'Orangerie and buy a combination ticket for the Musée d'Orsay. The price is right and you'll be saving time by not waiting in line at the Orsay.

Opening Hours:
Mon, Wed-Sun: 9am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Jardin des Tuileries

2) Jardin des Tuileries (must see)

The Tuileries Garden ('Jardin des Tuileries') is a public garden located between the Louvre Museum and the Place de la Concorde in Paris. On October 6, 1789, as the French Revolution began, King Louis XVI was brought against his will to the Tuileries Palace. The garden was closed to the public except in the afternoon. Queen Marie Antoinette and the Dauphin were given a part of the garden for her private use, first at the west end of the Promenade Bord-d'eaux, then at the edge of the Place Lous XV. After the King's failed attempt to escape France, the surveillance of the family was increased. The royal family was allowed to promenade in the park on the evening of September 18, 1791, during the festival organized to celebrate the new French Constitution, when the alleys of the park were illuminated with pyramids and rows of lanterns. The garden was also used for revolutionary holidays and festivals.

Why You Should Visit:
It's free, you can lounge in green chairs, have an ice cream or a drink, people watch and enjoy some calm before entering the nearby Louvre or resuming your stroll down the Champs-Élysées.
From the pond near Place de la Concorde, you can see the Eiffel Tower and also a lot of beautiful bird life.

Tip:
Don't just stay in just one place – explore a variety of views and spots, as each provides a different perspective!

Opening Hours:
Daily: 7am-9pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume

3) Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume

The Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume dating back to the year of 1986. It is a museum of contemporary art, located in the north-west corner of the Tuileries Gardens. The rectangular building was constructed in 1861 during the reign of Napoleon III. The building in which the museum is located had a rich history, as it originally housed real tennis courts (the name of this game in French is jeu de paume). After this it has been a place to store Jewish cultural property. In 1991, the Jeu de Paume reopened as "France's first national gallery of contemporary art", with an exhibition devoted to Jean Dubuffet. Subsequent retrospectives were dedicated to international artists. In 1999, the museum chose American architect Richard Meier as the subject of its first-ever architectural exhibition. Since 2004 the Jeu de Paume has developed into a center for modern and postmodern photography and media and mounting survey exhibitions.

Operation hours: Tuesday: 11:00 am - 9:00 pm; Wednesday - Sunday: 11:00 am - 7:00 pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Hotel Ritz

4) Hotel Ritz

The Hôtel Ritz is a grand palatial hotel in the heart of Paris, the 1st arrondissement. The hotel, which today has 159 rooms, was founded by the Swiss hotelier, César Ritz, in collaboration with the chef Auguste Escoffier in 1898. The new hotel was constructed behind the facade of an 18th-century town house, overlooking one of Paris's central squares. It was reportedly the first hotel in Europe to provide a bathroom en suite, a telephone and electricity for each room. It quickly established a reputation for luxury, with clients including royalty, politicians, writers, film stars and singers. Several of its suites are named in honor of famous guests of the hotel, including Coco Chanel and Ernest Hemingway who lived at the hotel for years. The palace and the square are masterpieces of classical architecture from the end of the reign of Louis XIV. The facade was designed by the royal architect Mansart in the late 17th century before the plot was bought and construction began in 1705. The Hôtel Ritz comprises the Vendôme and the Cambon buildings with rooms overlooking the Place Vendôme, and, on the opposite side, the hotel's famous garden.
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Place Vendôme

5) Place Vendôme

Place Vendôme was built on the orders of Louis XIV, as a grandiose setting that would embody absolute power in the very heart of Paris. Its regular architecture by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and pedimented screens canted across the corners give the rectangular Place Vendôme the aspect of an octagon. The original Vendôme Column at the centre of the square was erected by Napoleon I to commemorate the Battle of Austerlitz; it was torn down on 16 May 1871, by decree of the Paris Commune, but subsequently re-erected and remains a prominent feature on the square today.
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Colonne de Vendôme

6) Colonne de Vendôme

The original column was started in 1806 at Napoleon's direction and completed in 1810. It was modeled after Trajan's Column, to celebrate the victory of Austerlitz; its veneer of 425 spiraling bas-relief bronze plates was made out of cannon taken from the combined armies of Europe. These plates were designed by the sculptor Pierre-Nolasque Bergeret and executed by a team of sculptors. A statue of Napoleon, bare-headed, crowned with laurels and holding a sword in his right hand and a globe surmounted with a statue of Victory in his left hand, was placed atop the column.
Sight description based on wikipedia
7
Le Grand Véfour

7) Le Grand Véfour

Le Grand Véfour, the first grand restaurant in Paris, France, was opened in the arcades of the Palais-Royal in 1784 by Antoine Aubertot, as the Café de Chartres, and was purchased in 1820 by Jean Véfour, who was able to retire within three years, selling the restaurant to Jean Boissier. A list of regular customers over the last two centuries includes most of the immortal heavyweights of French culture and politics, along with the tout-Paris. Sauce Mornay was one of the preparations introduced at the Grand Véfour. Closed from 1905 to 1947, a revived Grand Véfour opened with the celebrated chef Raymond Oliver in charge in the autumn of 1948. Jean Cocteau designed his menu. The restaurant, with its early nineteenth-century neoclassical décor of large mirrors in gilded frames and painted supraportes, continues its tradition of gastronomy at the same location, "a history-infused citadel of classic French cuisine."
Sight description based on wikipedia
8
Musée de la Mode et du Textile

8) Musée de la Mode et du Textile

The Musée de la Mode et du Textile contains almost 80.0000 costumes dating back to the 16th century to the present. Another hundreds of thousands of fabrics chronicle the history of textiles. The highlights of the collections you can find here are the 7th-century Coptin tunic, court costumes from the era of the Sun King and other vintage articles. The museum dates to 1905 when the Musée des Arts Décoratifs started collecting outstanding examples of silks, embroidery, printed cotton, costumes, lace, and tapestry. In 1948, another collection of fashion and textiles was begun by the Union Française des Arts du Costume on an initiative by costume historian François Boucher. In 1981, the two collections merged, and in 1986, they opened to the public in the Louvre. Important French fashion designers and textile artists whose works are held in the collection include Azzedine Alaïa, Pierre Balmain, André Courrèges, Christian Dior, Christian Lacroix, Jeanne Lanvin, Paul Poiret, Paco Rabanne, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli, Madeleine Vionnet, Sonia Delaunay, Raoul Dufy, and others.
Sight description based on wikipedia
9
Pavillon de Flore

9) Pavillon de Flore

The Pavillon de Flore is a section of the Palais du Louvre in Paris, France. Its construction began in 1607, during the reign of Henry IV, and has had numerous renovations since. The Pavillon de Flore was built to extend the Grande Galerie, which formed the south face of the Palais du Louvre, to the Palais des Tuileries, thus linking the two palaces. During the French Revolution, the Pavillon de Flore, situated at the southwest corner of the Palais des Tuileries at the time, was renamed Pavillon de l'Égalité (House of Equality). Under its new name, it became the meeting point for several of the Committees of the period. Many other committees of the Revolutionary Government occupied the Palais des Tuileries (referred to by contemporaries as the Palace of the Nation) during the time of the National Convention. Notable occupiers included the Monetary Committee, the Account and Liquidation Examination Committee. However, the most famous was the Committee of Public Safety.
Sight description based on wikipedia
10
Androuet

10) Androuet

What to buy here: French Cheese.

Luckily, a lot of cheese is kept at room temperature and mold can be a good thing for certain types. If you want cheese as your souvenir, try to buy it right before you get on the plane and wrap it well to store in your checked bags. You may want to check on customs as many cheeses are not pasteurized and may be illegal to bring in to certain countries. Plan to spend anywhere from 2-40 euros depending on both the type and amount of cheese. My favorites are 1. Comté (also called Gruyère de Comté) made from unpasteurized cow's milk in eastern France. It has a strong and slightly sweet flavor and is a relatively harder cheese. Comté has the highest production figures of all French cheeses. 2. Brie, generally a cheese made by cows milk and may be produced from whole or semi-skimmed milk. Brie is usually purchased either in a full wheel or as a wheel segment. It is soft with a mild flavor. 3. Camembert is in the same family as Brie although from Normandy instead of the Champagne region. Camembert is fully covered by rind and has less fat than Brie. The flavors are similar but Camembert is a little stronger. My last recommendation is 4. Chèvre cheese. This cheese is made from goat milk. It has a more strong and tart flavor to it and a medium-soft texture.

Walking Tours in Paris, France

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Creating your own self-guided walk in Paris is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
City Center Nightlife

City Center Nightlife

A haven for the arts in Europe, with its influence felt worldwide, Paris boasts a steady stream of visitors to its fine city. After dark, guests to the City of Light can enjoy a multitude of great nightlife establishments that is sure to appeal to anyone looking for a hot night on the town. Whether its live DJs spinning intense electronic beats or a live acoustic jazz band you’re looking for Paris has it all. Take this City Center Nightlife Tour and explore the heart of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th arrondissements at night.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.8 km
Top Paris Museums

Top Paris Museums

The following tour comprises a few great museums situated along the Seine. As France has a rich historic past and a vast cultural background, there are a lot of museums exhibiting collections that prove that. You can visit some of them by taking the suggested walking tour presented below.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.5 km
Palais-Bourbon Walking Tour

Palais-Bourbon Walking Tour

The 7th arrondissement of Paris is the most affluent and prestigious residential area in France, home to the French upper class, plus a number of French national institutions, government offices and diplomatic missions. This neighborhood boasts typically Parisian architecture complete with vibrant cafes, restaurants and gourmet shops which draw foodies in their numbers. Among other attractions on this walk you will visit the Eiffel Tower, Hôtel des Invalides (Napoléon's resting place), Palais-Bourbon, Musée d'Orsay, Musee Rodin, and Musée du quai Branly.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.1 km
The Da Vinci Code Walking Tour

The Da Vinci Code Walking Tour

Owing to the success of the controversial "The Da Vinci Code" book by Dan Brown, Paris has become even an more popular tourist destination. This self-guided tour will take you through the main places described in the novel so that you could see for yourself and decide whether to believe or not.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.0 km
Montmartre Walking Tour

Montmartre Walking Tour

Montmartre is one of the most famous and visited neighborhoods in Paris. It has some extremely beautiful plazas and marvelous architectural masterpieces. This tour comprises a few of the most popular places to be visited in Montmartre.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.5 km
Champs-Elysees Nightlife

Champs-Elysees Nightlife

A haven for the arts in Europe, with its influence felt worldwide, Paris boasts a steady stream of visitors to its fine city. After dark, guests to the City of Light can enjoy a multitude of great nightlife establishments that is sure to appeal to anyone looking for a hot night on the town. Whether its live DJs spinning intense electronic beats or a live acoustic jazz band you’re looking for Paris has it all. Take this Champs-Élysées Nightlife Tour and discover the city’s eclectic range of great nightspots.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 0.9 km

Useful Travel Guides for Planning Your Trip


Top 16 Vegetarian Restaurants in Paris

Top 16 Vegetarian Restaurants in Paris

The French have great respect for the fresh, organic produce yet France isn’t famous for its vegetarian cooking. Hence it’s a good idea for vegetarian visitors to Paris to come prepared in advance. This guide shows you places around the city which serve vegetarian food, complete with the...
10 Unusual Things to Do in Paris, France

10 Unusual Things to Do in Paris, France

If you've visited Paris, you've probably seen the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, and Versailles. You probably whizzed through some world-class art, ate delicious food in restaurants with English menus, and bought crepes from a street cart. However, Paris has a lot of things to do that...
8 Best Food Markets in Paris for Authentic French Produce

8 Best Food Markets in Paris for Authentic French Produce

The image of Parisians that you may have in your head as strolling through a colourful market with a basket on their arm, chatting to vendors and picking up fresh produce, is quite accurate. Most Parisians do visit local markets at least once a week to stock up on the freshest fruit, vegetables,...
15 Places for Tasting Best French Desserts in Paris

15 Places for Tasting Best French Desserts in Paris

If you have a sweet tooth and it wishes to "eat your way" through Paris, this guide will show you how! Featured here are some of the most famous and prominent dessert spots in the French capital, where you can grab something sweet to enjoy. With 20 listed recommendations, you should be...
9 Must Try Cafes in Paris

9 Must Try Cafes in Paris

Discovering the best coffee and cafes in Paris can be difficult. The city is filled to the brim with brasseries and cafes, but very few offer the Anglophone standard of a good cup of coffee. This is a guide to inform tourists and Parisians alike of the new and somewhat established cafes in Paris...
Paris Souvenirs: 19 Distinctively French Products to Bring Home from Paris

Paris Souvenirs: 19 Distinctively French Products to Bring Home from Paris

You can hardly have enough money and luggage space to get all the takes your fancy in Paris. Luckily, with a little bit of tasteful advice and experience, you can save yourself some time and effort and pick up just about the right amount of things worth taking home. Listed here are some of the hints...