Museums Walking Tour in Strasbourg (Self Guided), Strasbourg

Art has an important role to play in Strasbourg's culture. There are various museums, divided according to area, type and period, which represent European art through the ages. Don't miss the chance to visit some of Strasbourg's most popular art museums listed below.
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Museums Walking Tour in Strasbourg Map

Guide Name: Museums Walking Tour in Strasbourg
Guide Location: France » Strasbourg (See other walking tours in Strasbourg)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 9
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.0 Km or 1.9 Miles
Author: ray
1
Musée de Sismologie et de Magnétisme Terrestre

1) Musée de Sismologie et de Magnétisme Terrestre

Musée de Sismologie et de Magnétisme Terrestre consists of two independent collections: one is made up of old station seismometers and the second has various devices used to measure the Earth's magnetic field. Visiting the museum, you'll get some valuable glimpses and insights into geophysics, seismology and terrestrial magnetism.

Opening hours: Wednesday, Saturday: 2 pm - 6 pm.
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Musée Zoologique

2) Musée Zoologique

A great place for all the family to visit is the Musée Zoologique which you will find on the University campus.

This Natural History museum began in 1804 when the City of Strasbourg bought Jean Hermann’s prized collection. In 1872 the museum was put under the University’s management. Since then it has expanded, notably with many magnificent specimens from Ludwig Döderlein’s collection. The museum was housed in its current building in 1893.

In the beginning the animals were stuffed using wood shavings, or their skin was set around wooden “skeletons” and it was difficult to get the exact shape right, but today they are set around resin models and are truly life-like.

There is a wonderful representation of animals and marine life, insects and birds, lizards and snakes. Some of the birds and animals on display are now extinct. Some of the insects are models made of papier-mâché. In the marine-life collection you will see a beautiful blown glass model of a jellyfish. The blown glass radiolarian is stunning and has been made much larger than real life, as these amoeboid protozoa are only 0.1mm in diameter.

Apart from skeletons, eggs, nests and skins, you will also find wolf skulls, which have been used by scientists in genetic research.

Opening hours: Wednesday - Monday: 10 am - 6 pm.
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Museum of Fine Arts

3) Museum of Fine Arts (must see)

No art lover should pass up the chance of visiting the Museum of Fine Arts which has been housed on the 1st and 2d floors of Rohan Palace since 1898. The collections present an overview of European art from the 13th century to 1871, with considerable weight given to Italian as well as Flemish and Dutch paintings, with artists such as Hans Memling, Correggio, Anthony van Dyck, Giotto, Pieter de Hooch, Botticelli, Jacob Jordaens, and Tintoretto, among many others.

The museum owns circa 865 works (as of 2009), of which 250 are on permanent display, as well as a small but valuable collection of sculptures (mostly busts), principally from Italy and France.

Tip:
Be sure to look out all of the windows for the spectacular views.

Opening Hours:
Wed-Mon: 10am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Museum of Decorative Arts

4) Museum of Decorative Arts (must see)

Don’t miss the chance to visit the Museum of Decorative Arts, which you will find in the stable wing of Palais Rohan. It has suffered in the World War II bombing raids of 1944 but the building has since been restored and the collections replenished. Besides the furniture and decoration of the Cardinals' apartments, the collections focus on the local production of porcelain (Strasbourg faience), silver-gilt, and clockmaking, with original parts of the medieval Strasbourg astronomical clock including the automaton rooster from 1354. The reconstructed living room of a former "hôtel particulier", the 1750s Hôtel Oesinger, displays 18th-century furniture in situ on a more intimate scale than the rooms of the palace.

Opening Hours:
Wed-Mon: 10am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Archeological Museum

5) Archeological Museum (must see)

The Musée Archeologique is housed in the basement of Rohan Palace; it is the largest of all the Alsatian museums and one of the best of its kind in France.

The items on display are regional archaeological findings dating from Prehistory and comprise an important collection including tools and fossils of mammoths found in the Rhine area dating back to the Paleolithic epoch and human bones found in the Mannlefelsen Grottos from the Mesolithic era.

The Neolithic epoch is represented by human skulls that had been trepanned, early ceramic vases and jewelry made of pearls, horns and boar tusks. From the Bronze Age, you can admire bronze bowls and see a skeleton from the Bell Beaker civilization.

In the Iron Age section of the museum, you will find the reproduction of a funeral chariot, ceramics and bronze jewelry, while the Gallo-Roman section has a fine example of a funeral stele, part of a Roman altar to the god Mars and bronze statues.

In the section dedicated to the Merovingian epoch, there are gold and silver funerary artifacts, ceramics, bowls and vases in engraved bronze, jewelry in molten glass and human remains.

Tip:
Pick up the free leaflets that help you pick out the highlights.

Opening Hours:
Wed-Mon: 10am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Œuvre Notre-Dame Museum

6) Œuvre Notre-Dame Museum (must see)

Musée de l’Œuvre Notre-Dame is housed in the Gothic/Renaissance building of the Foundation de l’Oeuvre Notre-Dame and in the early Baroque buildings around it on the Place du Chateau, next to the Notre-Dame Cathedral.

The museum displays Upper Rhenish fine and decorative arts from the early Middle Ages to 1681. The collection consists of original sculptures and architectural pieces damaged during the French Revolution, as well as stained glass windows by Peter Hemmel von Andlau, paintings by Hans Baldung, Sebastien Strokopff and Konrad Witz.

The collection also boasts valuable components from other Strasbourg churches, such as the Temple Neuf, destroyed in 1870, the Saint-Pierre-le-Vieux Church, renovated in 1867, and the Église Sainte-Madeleine, destroyed by fire in 1904. In addition, the Romanesque components (cloister, baptismal font) from St. Trophimus' Church, Eschau and the stained glass windows from St. Peter and St. Paul's Church, Wissembourg and Mutzig are also important.

Tip:
There's an audio-guide available, free and well worth getting for all the information it gives.
Don't miss the medieval garden but be warned that it's closed in bad weather, including thundershowers.

Opening Hours:
Tue-Sun: 10am-6pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
7
Historical Museum

7) Historical Museum (must see)

The Historical Museum on Rue du Vieux Marché aux Poissons is the ideal place to visit for the whole family.

The museum opened in 1920 and is housed in the former old slaughterhouse. It is dedicated to the economic, political, social and urban history of Strasbourg, with a heavy emphasis on the period between 1681 and 1870 when Alsace belonged to France, as opposed to Germany.

It also serves as a memorial to the men of Strasbourg who served in the French Army, with several displays of weapons and uniforms. There are some wonderful scale models, including a 1727 model of the city and another of the old Town Hall.

You will learn about the everyday life of the citizens, with examples of their clothing and furniture. There is a marvelous collection of coins, drawings, paintings, and photographs. The paintings include a 19th century aquarelle of the “Ponts Couverts” and “Le Pont du Corbeau et la Grande Boucherie” by Eugene Petitville.

There are also archaeological artifacts discovered in the city. You can admire various examples of 16th century stained glass windows and the Treaty of the Capitulation of Strasbourg in 1681.

If you are visiting with your children, they won’t have time to get bored because there are special games and activities for them all around the museum.

Tip:
The visit comes with a hi-tech, free audio guide in different languages that is set to provide information automatically. Make sure you get one.
Another highlight is the relief map interactive video that you should absolutely watch when you are there!

Opening Hours:
Wed-Mon: 10am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
8
Alsatian Museum

8) Alsatian Museum (must see)

You will love the Alsatian Museum which is housed in various timber-framed Renaissance houses on the Quai Saint Nicholas. The idea for this type of museum originated in 1900 with an article in the “Revue Alsacienne Illustrée”, calling for the preservation of objects from the past for future generations. The museum opened in 1907 with a very pro-French festival that annoyed the German City Council no end. In 1917 the museum was bought by the City of Strasbourg, which was once again under French rule.

You will see over 5,000 items devoted to art and folk tradition and rural life in the 18th and 19th centuries. You will find costumes, earthenware crockery, furniture and both religious and non-religious paintings.

The museum tour consists of visiting the city’s old houses that are linked by passageways and stairways. The reconstructed rooms represent Alsace’s wine country, the agricultural plains and the mountain area of the Vosges. There are also reconstructions of craftsmen’s workshops and an excellent representation of Strasbourg’s Jewish community. When you arrive in the “country kitchen” you almost expect the smell of fresh bread to linger in the air, and the pharmacy displays a mixture of 18th-century medicines and alchemy.

An audio guide is available in English upon request.

Tip:
If you intend to visit more than two museums on the same day, then you should buy a day pass. Optionally too, you can buy a 3-day pass from the tourist office, or a Strasbourg Pass.

Opening Hours:
Wed-Mon: 10am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
9
Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art

9) Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (must see)

You will find the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art on the left bank of the River Ill and you shouldn’t miss visiting it as it is one of the largest of its kind in France.

The museum was founded in 1973 and it moved into the new building, designed by Adrien Fainsilber, in 1998. The museum complex also houses the art library of the municipal museums and an auditorium for concerts, conferences and films.

The museum displays Western European paintings, graphic arts, sculpture multimedia and design from 1870 to the present day. It also has a large photographic library and an artistic video collection.

You will be able to admire graphic arts, paintings and sculptures by Gustave Doré; graphic arts, sculptures and stained glass windows by Jean Arp among others, as well as works by contemporary German artists including Baselitz, Lupertz, Richter, Vostell and many more.

There is also a fine range of works by Kandinsky, Monet, Picasso, Pissarro and Rodin. The museum hosts annual temporary exhibitions, displaying the works of an individual artist or an artistic genre.

Tip:
Stop by the very nice café with outdoor seating and great views over la Petite France, as well as the excellent bookshop that covers art of every kind.

Opening Hours:
Tue-Sun: 10am-6pm; closed on Mondays
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Strasbourg, France

Create Your Own Walk in Strasbourg

Create Your Own Walk in Strasbourg

Creating your own self-guided walk in Strasbourg is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Landmarks Walking Tour

Landmarks Walking Tour

Strasbourg is a very popular tourist destination because it offers you many wonderful sights. The city has the reputation of being one of the most beautiful cities of France, so during your walking tour here don't miss out on the chance to see some of the most famous landmarks of Strasbourg, listed below.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
The German Quarter Walking Tour

The German Quarter Walking Tour

Strasbourg's close proximity to the border of Germany is why German culture has influenced much of the social and cultural life of the city. This walking tour will lead you to some of the most visited sights of the German Quarter of Strasbourg.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.3 km
Strasbourg for Kids

Strasbourg for Kids

Strasbourg, situated in the Alsace region of France, is a very popular tourist destination. Is famous for its great architecture. The city centre is classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Also you'll find here a lot of attractions meant for children. Check out the most interesting destinations for your children in this self-guided tour of Strasbourg.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.8 km
Famous Squares and Streets Walking Tour

Famous Squares and Streets Walking Tour

Strasbourg holds the reputation for being one of the most beautiful cities in all of France. Visitors of this city should spend some time walking through some of the famous squares in the area to appreciate all Strasbourg has to offer. Check out some of the top tourist sights in the following walking tour:

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
European Quarter Walking Tour

European Quarter Walking Tour

Strasbourg is considered to be the cradle of Europe. This city is located between France and Germany and has made room for many European institutions. Go and discover sights like the Palace of Europe, the European Parliament, the Arte Headquarters, etc. Take this walking tour to learn more about the city of Strasbourg.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
Nightlife Walk

Nightlife Walk

Strasbourg's nightlife is very vibrant due to the city's student population. Usually hangout time starts at 11 p.m. and ends at 6 a.m. Many of the hotspots are clustered around the cathedral and along rue des Juifs. Be sure to visit the hottest venues listed below.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.8 km