Religious Edifices Walking Tour, Venice

As a tourist, you definitely are aware that a country like Italy, especially a city like Venice, has a lot of sacred sites. It would be a pity not to take a look at some of the wonderful buildings built by humans in the name of the Lord. Glorious artists, architects and their disciples have given their lives and talent for our pleasure for centuries.
You can follow this self-guided walking tour to explore the attractions listed below. How it works: download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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Religious Edifices Walking Tour Map

Guide Name: Religious Edifices Walking Tour
Guide Location: Italy » Venice (See other walking tours in Venice)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 9
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.6 km
Author: nicole
1
Chiesa di San Zaccaria

1) Chiesa di San Zaccaria (must see)

San Zaccaria is a church in Venice, dedicated to St. Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, whose body it supposedly contains. It is a large edifice, located in the quiet Campo San Zaccaria, just off the waterfront to the southeast of St. Mark's Basilica. The present church was built in a mixture of Gothic and Renaissance styles between 1458 and 1515. Antonio Gambello was the original architect who started the building in the Gothic style, but the upper part of the facade and the upper parts of the interior were completed by Mauro Codussi in early Renaissance style.

The interior of the church has an apse surrounded by an ambulatory lit by tall Gothic windows, a typical feature of Northern European church architecture which is unique in Venice. The church houses one of the most famous work by Giovanni Bellini, the San Zaccaria Altarpiece. The walls of the aisles are entirely covered with paintings by other artists including Tintoretto, Angelo Trevisani, Giuseppe Salviati, Antonio Balestra, Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, Palma the Elder, and Van Dyck. The artist Alessandro Vittoria is buried in the church, his tomb marked by a self-portrait bust.

Why You Should Visit:
Unlike many of the popular name-churches that tourists flock to, this church is just that: a place of worship.
It retains its natural, quiet reverence, and helps restore a little equilibrium from the intensity of San Marcos.

Tip:
A small fee will let you visit old chapels and the flooded 9th-century crypt (helpful to bring footwear that is removable).

Opening Hours:
Mon-Sat: 10am-12pm / 4-6pm; Sun: 4-6pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Basilica di San Marco

2) Basilica di San Marco (must see)

St. Mark's Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice. It is the most famous of the city's churches and one of the best-known examples of Byzantine architecture. It lies on Piazza San Marco adjacent and connected to the Doge's Palace. Originally it was the "chapel" of the Venetian rulers and not the city's cathedral. Since 1807 it has been the seat of the Patriarch of Venice, archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Venice. The interior is based on a Greek cross, with each arm divided into three naves and emphasized by a dome of its own. This is based on Justinian's Basilica of the Apostles in Constantinople. The spacious interior of the building with its multiple choir lofts was the inspiration for the development of a Venetian polychoral style among the composers appointed as "maestro di cappella" at St Mark's.

Why You Should Visit:
Exceptionally beautiful blend of Byzantine and Western art!
The grandiosity of the mosaics and the wealth of the 'treasure room' will make you realize how powerful Venice was in its golden days.

Tip:
The lights are on only for limited times during the day (11:30-12:30) so make sure you time your visit so you can see/appreciate the beauty of the mosaics.
It's also definitely worth paying to go up to the first level just to see St. Mark's Square (and, of course, the interior of the Basilica) from a higher vantage point.

Opening Hours:
Daily: 9:30am-5pm; Sun: 2-4pm (until 5pm during the summer months)
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Padri Redentoristi

3) Padri Redentoristi

This is a Roman Catholic church in Venice, built more than 400 years ago. The church repeats the typical Vatican style in its interiors. It is very colorful, sumptuous and richly decorated. Some of the icons were brought here later, and their style is more realistic.
4
Chiesa San Bartolomeo

4) Chiesa San Bartolomeo

San Bartolomeo (Saint Bartholomew) is a church in Venice. It is near the Rialto Bridge in the sestiere, or neighborhood, of San Marco. The church was supposedly founded in 830, and was originally dedicated to Saint Demetrius of Thessaloniki. It was renovated in 1170, and became the church of the German community in Venice, whose commercial headquarters were nearby at the Fondaco dei Tedeschi. The church was rebuilt again in the 18th century. The bell tower was built in 1747-1754 based on designs of Giovanni Scalfarotto. The interior has two sculptures by the venetian sculptor of German origin Enrico Merengo (Heinrich Meyring). The chancel has a high altar by Meyring with three canvases by Palma the Younger, and a fresco on the ceiling by Michelangelo Morlaiter. On the left upper nave is a Miracle of the bronze serpents, also by Palma the Younger, while the left aisle houses a St. Matthew by Leonardo Corona and a Dormition by Pietro Muttoni.
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Chiesa Cattolica Parrocchiale S. Salvador

5) Chiesa Cattolica Parrocchiale S. Salvador

The Holy Savior Church was built in 1177. The facade was added later - in 1663, by Giuseppe Sardi. The entire edifice is designed in the Greek style and contains Greek crosses and ornaments. The facade is covered with white marble. This provides the church with a rare illumination and beauty. The Chiesa di San Salvatore (of the Holy Savior) is a church in Venice, northern Italy. Known in Venetian as San Salvador, is located on the Campo San Salvador, along the Merceria, the main shopping street of Venice. Adjoining the church is the former monastery, now the offices of the telephone company, which still contain Sansovino's magnificent cloisters. San Salvador is parish church of a parish in the Vicariate of San Marco-Castello. Other churches in the parish are San Bartolomeo and San Zulian. San Salvador is a small, but still active religious, cultural and social center. Below the left column on the facade, there is a cannonball embedded in the base of the column. It derived from a bombardment in 1849 by Austrian forces in the fort of Marghera, of the independent republic which had been proclaimed by Daniele Manin.
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Istituto Diocesano Per Il Sostentamento Del Clero

6) Istituto Diocesano Per Il Sostentamento Del Clero

This Institute was erected to support the church system in Venice. It used to be a Catholic school and a residence for those who ran the school. The complex contains an older and a more recent part. The adjoining parts were added later, as the need for space became more urgent. The building was first mentioned between 1347 and 1348.
7
Chiesa Cattolica Parrocchiale S.Stefano Protomartire

7) Chiesa Cattolica Parrocchiale S.Stefano Protomartire

This is one of the largest churches in Venice and is situated in the northern part of the city. The edifice was built in the 13th century, rebuilt in the 14th and redecorated partially in the 15th. Many years of construction, reconstruction and redecoration show us today a magnificent, wonderful architectural gem with painting and design to match. The church is the resting place for a few famous persons, such as: Francesco Morosini, Doge Andrea Contarini and others.
Sight description based on wikipedia
8
Istituto Ciliota

8) Istituto Ciliota

Istituto Ciliota was founded in 1845. It used to be a part of an old Augustinian monastery. The Dome, the largest and the most important part, contains 51 rooms. Between 1997 and 1999 the edifice was fully restored. This building has great Christian and artistic value.
9
Parrocchia Di San Moise

9) Parrocchia Di San Moise

This church is dedicated to Moses, as the Venetians have a tradition of preferring the prophets of the Old Testament. No one knows exactly when it was built, but it is known that in the 9th century the edifice was reconstructed. The facade is astonishing, and the main mural painting inside - Mount Sinai with Moses receiving the Tablets - is a masterpiece made by Heinrich Meyring.
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Venice, Italy

Create Your Own Walk in Venice

Create Your Own Walk in Venice

Creating your own self-guided walk in Venice is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Dorsoduro Walking Tour

Dorsoduro Walking Tour

Dorsoduro is one of the six districts of Venice, whose name translates as “hard bridge” from Italian, due to the area's relatively high terrain. The city's highest spots, along with Giudecca Island and Isola Sacca Fisola, are found here. Dorsoduro is home to some of Venice's most picturesque canals, historic locations and cultural venues, including Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Campo San Barnaba and Campo Santa Margherita. If modern art and historic architecture combined sounds like your kind of fun, Dorsoduro is the right place to go.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.0 km
Northern Venice Attractions Walking Tour

Northern Venice Attractions Walking Tour

The Northern Area of Venice is full of places of great historical and cultural importance. This tour offers you a view of some of the loveliest churches of Venice such as the Basilica dei Santi Giovanni e Paolo and Chiesa dei Santissimi Apostoli.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.2 km
Piazza San Marco Walking Tour

Piazza San Marco Walking Tour

Piazza San Marco is the main square in Venice. This is a place that enriched the cultural, social and economic life of Venice in the course of its history. The square is the host of the famous Venice landmarks as the Doge's Palace, Basilica San Marco and the Procuratie. Piazza San Marco is always full of people and pigeons.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.0 km
Romantic Walking Tour

Romantic Walking Tour

Venice is one of the most romantic cities in the world. It is the perfect destination for honeymoons, proposals and romantic trips. It is impossible to name the most romantic places in Venice because all the streets, canals and corners of this city are filled with romance, passion and love. This tour will guide you through the places where you can enjoy the perfect moment with your beloved.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.0 km
Grand Canal Walking Tour

Grand Canal Walking Tour

Grand Canal is the main channel in Venice. The channel has an "S" form dividing the main districts of Venice. Public transport is provided by water buses and private water taxis, but for tourists, it is recommended that they visit it by gondola. On both sides of the Grand Canal are established the most beautiful buildings dating from the 12th to the 18th centuries that tell the story of a thousand years of Venetian splendor.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.2 km
Castello District Walking Tour

Castello District Walking Tour

The eastern Castello area hosts the city's most extensive green area. Castello is the largest district of Venice. It has been inhabited since the 5th century and has a number of attractions for tourists, like the Basilica of San Pietro di Castello, the Arsenale di Venezia and the Biennale exhibits. It was and is home to Venice's most important industries.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.8 km

Useful Travel Guides for Planning Your Trip


15 Distinctively Italian Things to Buy in Venice

15 Distinctively Italian Things to Buy in Venice

Venice has been a tourist mecca for over a century now, with millions of visitors flocking in every year to see this unique place on the face of the Earth. Many, if not all, of these people seek to obtain something memorable as a token of their stay in this city. By far, not all of them know which...

Tips for Exploring City on Foot at Your Own Pace

Whether you are in Venice for a quick stopover or have a few days to see the city in more detail, exploring it on foot, at your own pace, is definitely the way to go. Here are some tips for you to save money, see the best Venice has to offer, take good care of your feet while walking, and keep your mobile device – your ultimate "work horse" on this trip - well fed and safe.

Saving Money with City Passes


To save yourself time and money visiting Venice's multiple sights, you may want to resort to the so-called city passes, such as the Official All Venice City Pass, Venezia Unica Tourist City Pass, 72-Hour Venice Transportation Pass, or Venice Museum Pass.

A city pass combines all of or multiple Venice's top highlights, tours and experiences in one prepaid attractions pass, using which you can save incredible amounts on general admission fees as compared to purchasing tickets separately. Often, a city pass also allows you to skip the lines at major attractions, thus saving you precious time.

Staying at Walk-Friendly Hotels


Since you're keen on exploring cities on foot (we assume that you are, and this is why you're here), it is important that you stay at a hotel close to the city's major attractions. It saves you time and energy. Here are a few of Venice hotels that are conveniently located, but at the same time, also not so ridiculously expensive: Hotel Concordia, Hotel Al Ponte Dei Sospiri, Baglioni Hotel Luna.

Taking Care of Your Feet


To ensure ultimate satisfaction from a day of walking around the city as big as Venice, it is imperative to take good care of your feet so as to avoid unpleasant things like blisters, cold or overheated soles, itchy, irritated or otherwise damaged (cracked) skin, etc. Luckily, these days there is no shortage of remedies to address (and, ideally, to prevent) these and other potential problems with feet. Among them: Compression Socks, Rechargeable Battery-Powered Thermo Socks for Cold Weather, Foot Repair Cream, Deodorant Powder, Shoes UV Sterilizer, and many more that you may wish to find a place in your travel kit for.

Travel Gadgets for Your Mobile Device


Your mobile phone or tablet will be your work horse on a self-guided walk. They offer tour map, guide you from one attraction to another, and provide informative background for the sights you wish to visit. Therefore it is absolutely essential to plan against unexpected power outages in the wrong place at the wrong time, much as to ensure the safety of your device.

For these and other contingencies, here's the list of useful appliances: Portable Charger/External Battery Pack, Worldwide Travel Charger Adapter, Power Converter for International Travel Adapter, and Mobile Device Leash.

Exploring City on Guided Tours


We have a strong bias towards exploring a city on foot, at your own pace, because this is how you get to see things up close with a maximum freedom. You decide how much time you wish to spend at each attraction and don't have to worry about following a crowd. That said, however, we also understand that some of you may want to go with a guided tour. If that is your case, here are some guided tours to consider. Be ready to fork out a bit of money, though, as a guided tour of Venice typically costs from around US$20 up to more than US$200 per person:

- Board a hop-on hop-off sightseeing boat to view all of Venice's top attractions while listening in the headsets to the commentary provided in a variety of languages, and be able get on and off at any of the stops along the route as often as you like.

- Experience Venice from dry land and water on the combo of 2-hour walk and half-hour gondola ride around the historic center, marveling at the Byzantine monuments and gliding down the canals of this marvelous city.

- Have a double pleasure for your eyes and ears combining a 30-minute gondola ride with a serenade, wafting by the fascinating sights of Venice in the company of a traditionally-dressed gondolier and a singer aboard.

- Having quenched your appetite for sightseeing, don't forget to treat yourself to some delicious specialties of Venice as well. Take a 2.5-hour tour led by a local guide to see the city's highlights on waters, plus check out several notable eateries to savor authentic Venetian delights.

- Discover the Jewish side of Venice from a culinary standpoint on a food tour of the historic Jewish ghetto. Guided by a food-connoisseur, you will visit a number of joints offering authentic local dishes thus acquainting yourself with the rich culture and food traditions of the Venetian Jews.

- Architecture-wise there's so much more to Venice than just St. Mark's Square. Be welcome to prove it to yourself on the guided walk exploring the artistic richness of Venice away from the trodden tourist paths.

Day Trips


If you have a day to spare whilst in Venice, why not use it to explore some of the out-of-town destinations, like Verona, Valpolicella, Florence, or the Dolomite Mountains. For as little as US$140+ to US$180+ per person you will get a chance to visit one of the most romantic cities in Italy (hometown of Romeo and Juliet), learn about Veneto’s winemaking heritage and sample the local wines, visit the Tuscan capital of Florence, soak up the bracing mountain scenery, and more. For any of these tours you will be picked up either straight at your hotel or a designated place in Venice, and transported by a comfortable air-conditioned coach or minibus or train to the destination of your choice and back again.