Religious Sites of Nashville, Nashville (Self Guided)

Being at the heart of Tennessee, Nashville features a great number of churches, cathedrals and other places of worship. Take the following walking tour to discover the most beautiful and interesting religious buildings in the city.
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Religious Sites of Nashville Map

Guide Name: Religious Sites of Nashville
Guide Location: USA » Nashville (See other walking tours in Nashville)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 6
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.4 km
Author: mary
1
St. Mary's Church

1) St. Mary's Church

St. Mary of the Seven Sorrows Church (commonly St. Mary's Catholic Church and formerly the Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin of the Seven) is a historic Catholic parish located at 330 5th Avenue, N. built in 1845, it is the oldest extant church in Nashville and the first Catholic church in what is now the Diocese of Nashville

The church was designed by William Strickland, also architect of the Tennessee State Capitol and other landmarks. The late antebellum Greek Revival structure features a gabled front entrance of two fluted Ionic order columns supporting a classical pediment. The cornerstone was laid in 1844, not long after the erection of the diocese in 1837; construction was delayed, however, by lack of funds. It was dedicated on October 31, 1847. Richard Pius Miles, the first Bishop of Nashville, was the driving force behind its construction, and he is now buried there. St. Mary's remained the cathedral until 1914, when the episcopal see was moved to the Cathedral of the Incarnation. The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Downtown Presbyterian Church

2) Downtown Presbyterian Church

The Downtown Presbyterian Church in Nashville, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (USA), was formerly known as First Presbyterian Church. The church is located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Church Street. As Old First Presbyterian Church it is designated a National Historic Landmark.

The congregation began worshiping at this site in 1816. The first structure burned down in 1832, and a second sanctuary was constructed the same year. The third (and present) sanctuary was constructed after a fire in 1848 destroyed the previous structure. The name was changed to "Downtown" after First Presbyterian moved out of downtown Nashville in 1955. The present sanctuary was designed by William Strickland, who also designed the Tennessee State Capitol, in the Egyptian Revival style.

Several historic events and persons of note have been associated with this church. When Downtown Presbyterian was still known as First Presbyterian Church, President Andrew Jackson was a member. ("General" Andrew Jackson was presented with a ceremonial sword on the steps of the original church, after the Battle of New Orleans.) Tennessee Governor James K. Polk was inaugurated in the second sanctuary. The present church building was seized by Federal forces and served as a military hospital during the Civil War. It temporarily became Nashville's Union Hospital No. 8, with 206 beds. The church has continued to be used as a refuge by Nashville's citizens from floods in the 1920s, by soldiers during the Second World War and presently has an active social ministry to the less fortunate.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
First Baptist Church

3) First Baptist Church

The Baptist Church of Nashville, also known as First Baptist Nashville, was opened in 1820. It is located in downtown Nashville within a walking distance of the Sommet Center. Both men and women serve here as deacons and assist in the Lord's Supper.
4
The United Methodist Publishing House

4) The United Methodist Publishing House

The United Methodist Publishing House in Nashville is one of the largest publishers and distributors of theological literature in the U.S. It is a private company with a staff of approximately 1,000. It is well-known for its support of the United Methodist clergy pension fund.
5
Christ Church Cathedral

5) Christ Church Cathedral

Christ Church Cathedral is the cathedral church of the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee in the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. The congregation was founded in 1829 and became the diocesan cathedral, by designation, in 1997. The Cathedral Choir at Christ Church has been recognized by the Nashville Scene for several years running as the "Best Church Music" in Nashville.

The 32-piece choir is currently directed by Michael Velting and performs weekly liturgies at the 11:00 services as well as other services throughout the year. Christ Church is the home of First Friday services, done in conjunction with the church's "Sacred Space" series. First Friday is held on the first Friday of each month and includes a unique blend of Episcopal liturgy, liturgical dance, visual arts, and music. Centered around the Eucharist, the service follows the liturgical calendar and uses the cues of the seasons as starting points for the service. For instance, in the November 2006 service, centered around All Saints Day and the Mexican Dia de los muertos, the Gothic sanctuary was decked out in bright colors, dancers wore bright Mexican-style clothes, and the music was inspired by Mexican conjunto and mariachi styles. First Friday has been recognized by the Episcopal News Service as "the Episcopal answer to the turbulent trend of contemporary worship in American religious life".

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Cathedral of the Incarnation

6) Cathedral of the Incarnation

The Cathedral of the Incarnation, located at 2015 West End Avenue, is the cathedral seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nashville. It is the third Catholic cathedral church for Nashville. The first was the Holy Rosary Cathedral which is now demolished and occupied the site of what is now the Tennessee State Capitol. The second was Saint Mary's Cathedral which still stands on the corner of Fifth and Church Streets.

Construction of the church began in 1910 under the direction of Bishop Thomas Sebastian Byrne. It was completed and dedicated July 26, 1914. The church has undergone two major renovations in 1937 and 1987. The latest renovation was supervised by Father Richard S. Vosko, a liturgical design consultant and priest of the Diocese of Albany who has overseen the redesign and renovation of numerous churches and cathedrals around the country. The church's architecture is modeled after the traditional Roman basilica. The primary architect was Fred Asmus.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Nashville, Tennessee

Create Your Own Walk in Nashville

Create Your Own Walk in Nashville

Creating your own self-guided walk in Nashville is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
A Walk on Tennessee Capitol Hill

A Walk on Tennessee Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill is the site of Tennessee legislation. It is a spectacular combination of the past meeting the present, with open-air museums, modern towers, state buildings, bridges, and other attractions. Don't miss the opportunity to visit the heart of Tennessee.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.1 km
City Orientation Walk I

City Orientation Walk I

Nashville, Tennessee, listed among the top 10 Places to Live and Work in the U.S, is the city of epic concert venues and countless music clubs which have largely contributed to its nickname, “Music City, USA”. Adding to the city's appeal further is the number of museums, theaters, art galleries and other cultural sights. Take this orientation walk to discover some of the most popular...  view more

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.1 km
Music City Landmarks

Music City Landmarks

Due to its legendary sites, Nashville is well-known all over the world as Music City, USA. This is a tour guide of the historic places where many music hits were born, including RCA Studio B on Music Row, the Exit/In club, the Sommet Center and many others.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.2 km
Jewels of African American Education in Nashville

Jewels of African American Education in Nashville

As a part of its great history, Tennessee is proud of its institutions of higher education for African Americans. This sightseeing tour will guide you to Nashville's famous Fisk University and its legendary Jubilee Hall, Tennessee State University and its glorious Gentry Complex. Take this tour to discover some of the most significant pages in American history.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.0 km
Nashville's Skyscrapers Walking Tour

Nashville's Skyscrapers Walking Tour

Alongside different antique style buildings, Nashville's skyscrapers fit in well with the city's architectural landscape. The best evidence of this is the breathtaking view from the top floor of a skyscraper. This tour highlights some of the most interesting buildings in the city.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.4 km
Vanderbilt Neighborhood Walk

Vanderbilt Neighborhood Walk

In this area you will find Vanderbilt University, Peabody College and Belmont University. Visit the neighborhood of National Historic Landmarks and learn about the history of the state's educational system. Enjoy a game with the Vanderbilt Commodores at the university's stadium!

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.3 km

Tips for Exploring City on Foot at Your Own Pace

Whether you are in Nashville for a quick stopover or have a few days to see the city in more detail, exploring it on foot, at your own pace, is definitely the way to go. Here are some tips for you to save money, see the best Nashville has to offer, take good care of your feet while walking, and keep your mobile device – your ultimate "work horse" on this trip - well fed and safe.

Taking Care of Your Feet


To ensure ultimate satisfaction from a day of walking around the city as big as Nashville, it is imperative to take good care of your feet so as to avoid unpleasant things like blisters, cold or overheated soles, itchy, irritated or otherwise damaged (cracked) skin, etc. Luckily, these days there is no shortage of remedies to address (and, ideally, to prevent) these and other potential problems with feet. Among them: Compression Socks, Rechargeable Battery-Powered Thermo Socks for Cold Weather, Foot Repair Cream, Deodorant Powder, Shoes UV Sterilizer, and many more that you may wish to find a place in your travel kit for.

Travel Gadgets for Your Mobile Device


Your mobile phone or tablet will be your work horse on a self-guided walk. They offer tour map, guide you from one attraction to another, and provide informative background for the sights you wish to visit. Therefore it is absolutely essential to plan against unexpected power outages in the wrong place at the wrong time, much as to ensure the safety of your device.

For these and other contingencies, here's the list of useful appliances: Portable Charger/External Battery Pack, Worldwide Travel Charger Adapter, Power Converter for International Travel Adapter, and Mobile Device Leash.