Top Paris Museums, Paris

The following tour comprises a few great museums situated along the Seine. As France has a rich historic past and a vast cultural background, there are a lot of museums exhibiting collections that prove that. You can visit some of them by taking the suggested walking tour presented below.
You can follow this self-guided walking tour to explore the attractions listed below. How it works: download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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Top Paris Museums Map

Guide Name: Top Paris Museums
Guide Location: France » Paris (See other walking tours in Paris)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 6
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.5 km
Author: karen
1
Musée Rodin

1) Musée Rodin (must see)

The Musée Rodin in Paris, France, is a museum that was opened in 1919 in the Hôtel Biron and surrounding grounds. It displays works by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Rodin used the Hôtel Biron as his residence from 1908, and subsequently donated his entire collection of sculptures to the French State on the condition that they turn the building into a museum dedicated to his works. The Musée Rodin contains most of Rodin's significant creations, including The Thinker, The Kiss and The Gates of Hell. Many of his sculptures are displayed in the museum's extensive garden. The gardens around the museum building contain many of the famous sculptures in natural settings. Behind the museum building are a small lake and casual restaurant. The museum has also a room dedicated to works of Camille Claudel. Some paintings by Monet, Renoir, and Van Gogh which were in Rodin's personal collections are also presented.

Why You Should Visit:
The museum's setting makes for a pleasant, laid-back viewing experience where you can forget about checking the time on your watch or rushing around to see the items on display.
The gardens give intimacy to viewing the sculptures. There is also an open area with benches to chill, a café & gelato shop, and a small pond.

Tip:
Do stop in the entry garden to pose for cheesy photos of yourself looking pensive next to the massive statue of The Thinker!

Opening Hours:
Tue-Sun: 10am-5:45pm; closed on Mondays
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Musée de l'Orangerie

2) Musée de l'Orangerie (must see)

The Musée de l'Orangerie is an art gallery of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings located on the Place de la Concorde in Paris. It contains works by Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Rousseau, Chaim Soutine, Alfred Sisley, and Maurice Utrillo among others. The gallery is on the bank of the Seine in the old orangery of the Tuileries Palace on the Place de la Concorde near the Concorde metro station.

A cycle of Monet's water-lily paintings, known as the Nympheas, was arranged on the ground floor of the Orangerie in 1927. The museum has housed the Walter-Guillaume collection of impressionist paintings since 1965. The Orangerie was renovated in order to move the paintings to the upper floor of the gallery. They are now available under direct diffused light as was originally intended by Monet.

Why You Should Visit:
Although the highlight here is a panorama of Monet's water lilies, there is plenty of first-rate artwork in the basement, too.

Tip:
Go to the l'Orangerie and buy a combination ticket for the Musée d'Orsay. The price is right and you'll be saving time by not waiting in line at the Orsay.

Opening Hours:
Mon, Wed-Sun: 9am-6pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Musée d'Orsay

3) Musée d'Orsay (must see)

Located on the left bank of the river Seine, Musee d’Orsay is a famous museum in Paris which houses many sculptures and paintings, both impressionist and post-impressionist. Many of these works had been held here even before the museum was established in 1986. At the turn of the 19th century, two large railway stations were built in Paris, namely: Gare de Lyon and Gare d'Orsay. The latter had a more important location and was planned by Compagnie d'Orléans. The amount of metal used in its construction exceeded that used to build the Eiffel Tower.

The Gare d'Orsay opened on July 14th, 1900, in time for the Paris World Exposition, and was widely regarded as a jewel of industrial architecture. By 1939, however, it was no longer deemed suitable for new, longer trains, and thus switched to serving suburban destinations only. During World War II, part of the station was used as a mailing centre. Over the years, the Gare d'Orsay has appeared in several movies, and, at one point, housed the Renaud-Barrault Theatre Company. It was completely abandoned from 1961 and escaped demolition only thanks to the French president Pompidou. In 1977, the French government decided to convert the building into a museum of 19th-20th-century art. The Bouygues industrial group took over the construction, done to a design by well-reputed ACT Architecture, whereas the Italian architect Gae Aulenti oversaw the conversion process.

On 1 December 1986, President Francois Mitterrand cut the ribbon for the newly established museum, which thenceforth has been known as the Musee d'Orsay, with a permanent collection spread over four levels, and a terrace. An impressive 20,000 sq. meter floor space on all four levels complements the multitude of great works from the impressionist and expressionist movements, including Naturalism, Realism, Architecture, and Sculpture. The d'Orsay is undoubtedly one of the most stunning museums you will ever have visited!

Why You Should Visit:
For a smaller venue and beautiful artwork by the masters, this is the place!
Houses not only paintings and sculpture but also decorative furnishings that would have only graced a palace!

Tip:
The secret pleasure here is the gorgeous 5th-floor restaurant under the huge clock and with one of the best views of Paris. Great value for money.

Opening Hours:
Tue-Wed, Fri-Sun: 9:30am-6pm; Thu: 9:30am-9:45pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Musée du Louvre

4) Musée du Louvre (must see)

The Musée du Louvre is one of the world's largest museums, the most visited museum in the world, and a historic monument. The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace (Palais du Louvre) which began as a fortress built in the late 12th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are still visible. The Musée du Louvre contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art in eight curatorial departments with more than 60,600 m2 (652,000 sq ft) dedicated to the permanent collection. As of 2008, the collection is divided among eight curatorial departments: Egyptian Antiquities; Near Eastern Antiquities; Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities; Islamic Art; Sculpture; Decorative Arts; Paintings; Prints and Drawings. The Louvre exhibits sculptures, objets d'art, paintings, drawings, and archaeological finds. It is the world's most visited museum, averaging 15,000 visitors per day, 65 percent of whom are tourists.

Why You Should Visit:
One of a kind experience & still one of the most wonderful places for an art lover.

Tip:
Like everyone says, buy tickets or museum pass early and don't forget the lesser-used underground mall entrance "Port de Lions".
There are SO many wings, floors, and exhibits that you must plan several hours if you hope to see it all!

Opening Hours:
Mon, Thu, Sat, Sun: 9am-6pm; Wed, Fri: 9am-9:45pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Centre Georges Pompidou

5) Centre Georges Pompidou (must see)

Centre Georges Pompidou (also known as the Pompidou Centre) is a complex in the Beaubourg area in Paris. It was designed in the style of high-tech architecture. It houses the Bibliothèque Publique d'Information, a vast public library, the Musée National d'Art Moderne which is the largest museum for modern art in Europe, and IRCAM, a center for music and acoustic research.

It is named after Georges Pompidou, the President of France from 1969 to 1974 who commissioned the building and was officially opened in 1977. The Center Pompidou has had over 150 million visitors since 1977. The sculpture, Horizontal by Alexander Calder, a free-standing mobile that is twenty-five feet high, was placed permanently in front of the Centre Pompidou by the architect of the building, Renzo Piano.

Why You Should Visit:
An intriguing museum, rich with artworks ranging from modernity to contemporary art, from the most famous to the newest and strangest productions of recent artists.
The venue is beautifully designed, spacious and offers a marvelous view of the city's landmarks.

Tip:
Make sure to see Constantin Brancusi's workshop which is located just outside the building but is still part of the property. You will find many of his sculptures there!
Like many French art museums, the bookstore and shop are excellent, so check them out, too, if you can.

Opening Hours:
Wed, Fri-Mon: 11am-9pm; Thu: 11am-11pm; closed on Tuesdays
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Carnavalet – Musée de l'Histoire de Paris

6) Carnavalet – Musée de l'Histoire de Paris

The Carnavalet Museum in Paris is dedicated to the history of the city. The museum occupies two neighboring mansions: the Hôtel Carnavalet and the former Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint Fargeau. On the advice of Baron Haussmann, the civil servant who transformed Paris in the latter half of the 19th century, the Hôtel Carnavalet was purchased by the Municipal Council of Paris in 1866; it was opened to the public in 1880. Inside the museum, the exhibits show the transformation of the village of Lutèce, which was inhabited by the Parisii tribes, to the grand city of today with a population of 2,201,578. The Carnavalet houses about 2,600 paintings, 20,000 drawings, 300,000 engravings and 150,000 photographs, 2,000 modern sculptures and 800 pieces of furniture, thousands of ceramics, many decorations, models and reliefs, signs, thousands of coins, countless items, many of them souvenirs of famous characters, and thousands of archeological fragments.

Operation hours: Tuesday - Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Paris, France

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Creating your own self-guided walk in Paris is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Luxembourg (6th Arr) Walking Tour

Luxembourg (6th Arr) Walking Tour

This tour takes you to explore the 6th or so-called Luxembourg arrondissement, one of the most expensive districts of Paris, home to posh boutiques, eateries and iconic cafes once favored by legendary writers, the likes of Hemingway and Camus. The area is particularly renowned for its unique architecture, rich history, and deeply rooted intellectual tradition. On this tour you will visit Jardin du Luxembourg, Le Palais de Luxembourg, Saint-Sulpice Church and other notable sights.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.4 km
Champs-Elysees Nightlife

Champs-Elysees Nightlife

A haven for the arts in Europe, with its influence felt worldwide, Paris boasts a steady stream of visitors to its fine city. After dark, guests to the City of Light can enjoy a multitude of great nightlife establishments that is sure to appeal to anyone looking for a hot night on the town. Whether its live DJs spinning intense electronic beats or a live acoustic jazz band you’re looking for Paris has it all. Take this Champs-Élysées Nightlife Tour and discover the city’s eclectic range of great nightspots.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 0.9 km
Religious Sights Walking Tour

Religious Sights Walking Tour

Paris is one of the cities that can fairly be considered a religious destination because of the number of churches that one is able to visit here. Reports show that, for instance, Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, recorded 13.65 million visits in 2006, and the number is increasing every year. This is a tour that includes some of the most beautiful Christian relics located in the center of Paris - the Latin Quarter.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
The Da Vinci Code Walking Tour

The Da Vinci Code Walking Tour

Owing to the success of the controversial "The Da Vinci Code" book by Dan Brown, Paris has become even an more popular tourist destination. This self-guided tour will take you through the main places described in the novel so that you could see for yourself and decide whether to believe or not.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.0 km
Hotel-de-Ville Walking Tour

Hotel-de-Ville Walking Tour

This tour takes you to explore the 4th arrondissement of Paris (aka "arrondissement de l'Hôtel-de-Ville") visiting The City Hall (Hôtel de Ville), Notre Dame Cathedral, Maison de Victor Hugo and other notable sights of the district otherwise renowned for its cute little streets, cafes, and shops. Rather fashionable as such, it is also regarded by the locals as expensive and congested. We invite you to take this walk and see for yourself whether it's true or not.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.6 km
Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour I

Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour I

The capital of France is made up of 20 administrative districts, commonly referred to as “arrondissements”. The 1st arrondissement of Paris sits mainly on the right bank of the River Seine and is one of the city's oldest, smallest and least populated areas. It is home to some of Paris's major landmarks, while the remainder of it is taken up by business and administration offices. On this tour you will visit Place du Châtelet, La Conciergerie, Le Palais Royal, Musée du Louvre and many other notable attractions.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.1 km

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