Istanbul Shopping Guide: 16 Turkish Items To Bring Home

Istanbul Shopping Guide: 16 Turkish Items To Bring Home

Istanbul, known throughout history as Byzantium and Constantinople, has been a major center of commerce and trade, a place where merchants and general folk would rush to regularly in search of exotic things. In our days, modern travelers to Istanbul are also bound to enjoy a truly magnificent shopping experience. The sheer number of shops, bazaars, goods and insistent shopkeepers here is, indeed, overwhelming. To focus your search and make your shopping experience in Istanbul memorable in a good sense, check out the list of suggested gift items reflecting the true spirit of Turkey and learn where they to find them at the best possible prices.
Image Courtesy of: Giovanni

1. Hand Painted Ceramic Plates

Hand Painted Ceramic Plates
Turkish ceramics, renowned for their rich colors and elaborate designs, are available for sale in Istanbul in great variety. Originally created to imitate Chinese pottery, Iznik craftsmen in Anatolia quickly developed their own style and patterns. By the 16th century, under Suleyman the Magnificent, this style of pottery was in full swing. Turkish artisans love combining geometric patterns with carnation, roses, hyacinths and above all, tulips. Many different techniques for glazing, firing and creating colors have been discovered over the centuries, allowing for the creation of a multitude of ceramic products. Small plates start at around 20TL and the prices can rise to around 200TL for larger, more intricately painted plates. These plates are found throughout the Grand Bazaar, Sultanahmet, Spice Market and Istiklal Caddesi.

An excellent shop, specializing in hand-painted ceramics, is Beyoglu El Sanatlari Evi (Istiklal Caddesi No: 180/A, Tünel, Phone: 212 293 99 90). Located near the upper Tünel entrance in Istiklal Caddesi, this family-run business is easily accessible. They are open 7 days a week from 9:30am to 9pm.
Where to find it:
Beyoglu El Sanatlari Evi, Istiklal Caddesi No: 180/A, Tünel, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 293 99 90
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:30am-9pm

Grand Bazaar, Beyazıt Mh., Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 519 1248

Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Buy It on Amazon:
Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

2. Water Pipes

Water Pipes
Image Courtesy of: Michael Coghlan
Water pipes, known as "nargile" in Turkish, whether you smoke them or not, make for beautiful decorative pieces. The glass bottles are colorful and the attached metal pipe, along with the hose, create an interesting shape, rather symbolic of the Middle East. During the Ottoman period, nargiles were quite popular in Turkey. Their popularity started to wane with the arrival of a cigarette. In recent times, however, the popularity of nargiles started picking up again seeing more and more coffee shops and pubs with people coming to enjoy the flavored water pipes. Nargile come in various colors and sizes. Small nargile start at 20TL, while the medium sized ones cost around 30TL. These can be bought in Istiklal Caddesi, Sultanahmet and in the Grand Bazaar.

Istiklal Caddesi is the most famous shopping street in Istanbul’s European part. Stretching from Taksim Square to Tunel, Istiklal features 1.5km of shopping, cafes and restaurants. Shops usually open at 10am and close at 9pm, however, some may stay open longer, as the ever present crowds provide good clientele. Sultanahmet is the main tourist district in Istanbul. Housing Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque, and the majority of tourist hotels, pensions and hostels, Sultanahmet also offers good shopping. General shop hours are Monday to Saturday from 9am to 7pm, although some shops will stay open longer, especially in summer months. Some shops are also open on Sundays as well. The Grand Bazaar is located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. It is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. It is open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm; closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed
Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

3. Ottoman Jewelry

Ottoman Jewelry
Image Courtesy of: Nevit Dilmen
Locally produced jewelry, inspired by authentic Ottoman pieces, can make a truly unique gift. The recent Turkish TV series, Muhtesem Yuzyil (Magnificent Century), has reinforced the locals’ desire for Ottoman-style jewelry. Turkish jewelry is available at the Grand Bazaar and Spice Market, but the best place for Ottoman jewelry is Eller Sanat Galerisi in Postacilar Sokak, just off Istiklal Caddesi, next to the Dutch Consulate (İstiklal Cad. Postacılar Sok. No: 4/A Tünel. Phone: 212 249 2364). They are experts in all eras of Anatolian jewelry and their premises very much resemble a museum. They also run workshops on traditional jewelry-making. All the pieces on sale are made on the premises and the prices start at 50TL for simpler items upwards, according to the metals and stones used. The shop is open Monday through Saturday from 10am to 8pm, and Sundays from 2pm to 8pm, although the hours can be flexible and the opening times sometimes delayed.
Where to find it:
Eller Sanat Galerisi on Postacilar Sokak just off Istiklal Caddesi next to the Dutch Consulate, İstiklal Cad. Postacılar Sok. No: 4/A Tünel, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 249 2364
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 10am-8pm; Sunday: 2pm-8pm
Buy It on Amazon:
Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

4. Backgammon Set

Backgammon Set
Image Courtesy of: User:Ptkfgs
In almost every street corner café in Istanbul you can see men playing tavla, or backgammon. If you lose the game, tradition dictates that you must take your board home with you, tucked under your arm, so that everyone could see that you've lost and are now heading home for more practice. That may be one way to obtain a tavla set, but a more recommendable way to get it is buying. The Grand Bazaar has a number of stalls selling handcrafted sets that combine mother of pearl and various woods in exquisite mosaics. Travel-size sets start at 20TL, full-size - 50TL. The Grand Bazaar is located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. This is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. It is open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm, and closed on Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed
Buy It on Amazon:

5. Turkish Coffee Set

Turkish Coffee Set
Turkish coffee is served in unique cups and saucers that are often gold rimmed. Beautifully decorated cups and saucers are served on a silver tray as a sign of good hospitality in Turkish homes. Turkish coffee cups can be ceramic or copper. When buying a coffee set, it is important to ask if it can be used to drink from or if it is just for decoration. Many people sell decorative sets that may contain paints or metal alloys not approved for foodware. If you want a decorative set, handmade from copper with hand-painted detailing, go to Pasabahce on Istiklal Caddesi. Those sets will go for around 200TL. However, if you are looking for a practical set to use at home, it is best to buy it in a Turkish grocery store, such as Migros. There you can get a lovely set for around 15TL.

Migros is a high-end grocery chain with 173 stores in Istanbul alone. There is a small Migros, located one block north of the Galata Tower, and a larger one, located inside the MetroCity shopping centre in Levent on the subway line from Taksim. They are open 7 days a week from 10am to 10pm and their website (available only in Turkish) is www.migros.com.tr. Pasabhace is another high-end Turkish store specializing in glass tableware. They are known as the father of Turkish glassware. Nowadays, their product spectrum has expanded to include not only glassware, but also ceramics and art pieces containing precious and semi-precious metals. They have many outlets throughout Turkey, including one in Istiklal Caddesi near Tunel (Istiklal Caddesi 314, Tel: 212 244 0544), open Mon – Sat from 10am to 8pm and Sun 12-8pm. Their website is www.pasabahcemagazalari.com.
Where to find it:
Pasabhace, Istiklal Caddesi 314, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 244 0544
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 10am-8pm; Sunday: 12pm-8pm

Migros, Tesvikiye Mh., Sakay?k Sokak 40, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm

Migros, Altun?zade Mh., Capitol, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm
Buy It on Amazon:

6. Turkish Sweets

Turkish Sweets
Everyone is familiar with Turkish Delight, known as Lokum in Turkish. There are many varieties of Turkish delight available out there, but the key advantage of getting it in Turkey is that you can sample all the different kinds from behind the counter, thus finding the flavors you enjoy most. When mixing and matching from behind the counter, prices can range from 8TL/kg for rose-flavored Turkish Delight, to 29TL/kg for the more elaborate ones with various nuts. Pismaniye, a very popular Turkish sweet largely unknown outside Turkey, is like Turkish cotton candy. Boxed sets of Lokum or Pismaniye range in price between 5TL and 10TL.

One of the best places to buy a variety of Turkish sweets is Koska, a Turkish sweets store with several branches throughout the country, including two in Istiklal Caddesi near Tunel (the closest one to Galata Tower is Istiklal Caddesi 122A, phone: (0212) 244 0877). They are open 7 days a week from 9am to 11pm. Their website is www.koska.com (currently available only in Turkish, but the English version is also under construction).
Where to find it:
Koska, Istiklal Caddesi 122A, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 513 8900, +90 212 244 0877
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 9am-11pm
Buy It on Amazon:

7. Musical Instruments

Musical Instruments
Image Courtesy of: JX Bardant
Traditional Turkish music implies a number of instruments that can be easily packed into a traveler’s suitcase. Wind instruments, such as Kaval, Mey and Sipsi, as well as stringed instruments, known as Baglama, make unique gifts for music lovers and collectors. You can buy a Mey for 30TL, or a basic Baglama for a minimum of 100TL. Prices on instruments vary greatly, depending on their quality. It is best to discuss your needs with a shop owner in order to buy the right instrument.

The best place for travelers to buy musical instruments in Istanbul is Galip Dede Caddesi (off the end of Istiklal Caddesi towards the Galata Tower) in the Tunel district. This is an old cobble-stone street lined with music shops on each side. Shops are generally open from 10am to 8pm 7 days a week, although some may be closed on Sundays.
Where to find it:
Galip Dede Caddesi
GALATA MEVLEVİHANESİ MÜZESİ (music instruments museum) Galip Dede Cad. 15, 34430 Istanbul - Avrupa, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-8pm
Buy It on Amazon:

8. Belly Dancing Hip Scarf

Belly Dancing Hip Scarf
Image Courtesy of: D. Sharon Pruitt
Belly dancing (or oriental dancing) is known worldwide. Just as famous are the costumes the female dancers wear. Tiny tops are usually trimmed with tassels or coins, and loose fitting pants or skirts - with a coin belt or scarf around the hips that shake with the dancer’s hip movements. While buying an entire belly dancing outfit might be a bit too much for an average person, the hip scarves with coins can be used in a variety of ways and may serve as good reminders of holidays in Istanbul. The best place to buy these is the Grand Bazaar at 10TL apeice. The Grand Bazaar is located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. This is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. It is open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm; closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed
Buy It on Amazon:

9. Hand-made Olive Oil Soap

Hand-made Olive Oil Soap
Image Courtesy of: Vikiçizer
Locally made natural health and beauty products are currently on the rise in Turkey. Handmade olive oil soaps are part of this trend and represent the centuries old tradition stemming from hamams. Whilst in Istanbul, make sure to experience some of the world’s finest hand-made soaps "first hand". Local soap makers combine high quality olive oil with other botanical extracts to create beautiful bars of soap for various skin types. A good place to buy these would be the Egyptian Spice Market (Mısır Çarşisi), located in Eminönü across from the Galata Bridge. It is open Monday to Saturday from 8am to 7:30pm and Sundays from 9:30am to 7pm.
Where to find it:
Spice Bazar, Eminönü Meydanı, 34440 Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 8am-7:30pm; Sunday: 9:30am-7pm
Buy It on Amazon:

10. Turkish Coffee

Turkish Coffee
Coffee originated in the Middle East and the Ottoman Empire eventually developed a very strong coffeehouse culture. Turkish coffee involves boiling finely ground coffee in a pot - cezve - with sugar. The coffee powder settles at the bottom of the cup and the top is covered with a layer of foam. After drinking their coffee, the Turks turn their cups upside down on their saucers and wait for them to cool. Once cooled, a fortune teller (usually any Turkish woman) “reads” the coffee grounds and predicts the drinker’s future. In order to enjoy Turkish coffee at home, first you need to buy a proper Turkish coffee pot - cezve, and then some finely powdered Turkish coffee. The best place to buy these is a grocery store where prices are much lower than in the tourist-oriented markets. Here, you can get a steel, 4-cup cezve for 8TL and the average price of Turkish coffee is just under 2TL/100g.

Migros is a high-end grocery chain with 173 stores in Istanbul alone. There is a large Migros located inside the MetroCity shopping centre in Levent, on the subway line from Taksim. They are open 7 days a week from 10am to 10pm and their website (available only in Turkish) is www.migros.com.tr Dia. Bim and Sok grocery stores are also found throughout the city in every neighborhood. These stores are smaller and generally cheaper, but their selection can be limited.
Where to find it:
Migros, Tesvikiye Mh., Sakay?k Sokak 40, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm

Migros, Altun?zade Mh., Capitol, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm
Buy It on Amazon:

11. Kilim

Kilim
Image Courtesy of: Vladimer Shioshvili
Writing on Turkish gifts is not possible without mentioning the famous Turkish carpets, kilims. Kilim is a flat woven carpet rich in colors and intricate geometric patterns. The latter have changed very little throughout centuries. Originally, because flat woven carpets didn't last as long as pile carpets, they were considered inferior and of lower commercial value for foreign trade. As a result, free from any foreign competition, the Turks have managed to preserve their original weaving techniques very much intact. Nowadays, kilims are no longer considered inferior and the high quality pieces can be rather expensive. While you might not have the space in your suitcase for a full-size rug, a number of smaller pieces can fit in just nicely. Doormat-size rugs start at 60TL for the most basic patterns, running up to about 150TL for more detailed, original designs and better quality.

Turkish carpet sellers are renowned for their persistence and oftentimes aggressive sales techniques. Shops are usually family-run and the level of pressure in sales depends on which cousin or uncle works this particular day. When buying a carpet, it is best to visit several shops and see which carpets you like and which salespeople you feel most comfortable with. Shopping at the Grand Bazaar allows you to do this easily. The Grand Bazaar is located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. This is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets, open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm. It is closed on Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed
Buy It on Amazon:

12. Pashminas

Pashminas
Image Courtesy of: tommy
In Istanbul you can find a spoiling choice of scarves of various quality, colors and designs. Of the best quality are reputedly the locally made pashminas, combining cashmere and silk. Their prices vary widely from 10TL for the cheaper ones (but still very beautiful) to the pure silk pashminas selling at 100TL and more. If you don’t know your cashmeres and silks well, then you're risking being sold something at a higher price with the claim that it is of a better quality. Note, you can buy some cheaper pashminas and they would still retain their perfect condition years afterwards.

Pashminas can be bought everywhere in Turkey. The best prices (after a bit of haggling) could be found with street vendors in Sultanahmet, which is the main tourist district of Istanbul. Home to Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque, and the majority of tourist hotels, pensions and hostels, Sultanahmet also offers good shopping, including street vendors who lay their wares on tablecloths on the sidewalks in the afternoons and on weekends.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed

13. Raki

Raki
Image Courtesy of: Chris Pople
The traditional national drink of Turkey, this anise-flavored spirit is also known as Lion’s Milk. It can be drunk straight, but is usually taken with ice and water which turns the clear liquid milky white. It is frequently consumed with fish and seafood meals. The much loved Turkish leader, Kemal Ataturk, was known for his fondness of raki and, apparently, loved to debate with his friends and advisers over raki late at night. The most popular brand of Turkish raki is Yeni Raki.

You can buy it at any liquor or grocery store in Istanbul for about 40TL per bottle (70cl), but it is probably cheaper to pick one up at Duty Free at the airport when leaving the country. Still, if you want to buy it at a grocery store in Istanbul, Migros is the best option. This high-end grocery chain has 173 stores in Istanbul alone. There is a small Migros located one block north of the Galata Tower and a larger one inside the MetroCity shopping centre in Levent on the subway line from Taksim. They are open 7 days a week from 10am to 10pm and their website (available only in Turkish) is www.migros.com.tr.
Where to find it:
Migros, Tesvikiye Mh., Sakay?k Sokak 40, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm

Migros, Altun?zade Mh., Capitol, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 247 1710
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 10am-10pm

14. Turkish Jams and Honey

Turkish Jams and Honey
No Turkish breakfast is complete without jam and honey. The variety of climates in Turkey allow for a myriad of different fruits to be grown. These fruits are then made into jams and enjoyed all year long. Typical types of jam include apricot, sour cherry, rose, quince and fig. Prices for jams usually range from 5TL to 10TL a jar.

The Turks are also famous for their flavorful honey, gathered in the forests and fields of Anatolia. Different types of honey are made by having beehives in areas where they pollinate different flowers and trees. You can even find Pine Tree honey! The various types of honey are said to have different health benefits. Honey can be quite expensive, depending on the type, up to 40TL/jar. Honey gift items can be bought at Koska, which is a Turkish sweets store with several branches throughout the country, including two in Istiklal Caddesi near Tunel (the closest one to Galata Tower is Istiklal Caddesi 122A, phone: (0212) 244 0877). They are open 7 days a week from 9am to 11pm. Their website is www.koska.com (currently available only in Turkish, but the English version is already under construction).
Where to find it:
Koska, Istiklal Caddesi 122A, Istanbul, Turkey
Phone: +90 212 244 0877
Operation Hours: Monday-Sunday: 9am-11pm
Buy It on Amazon:

15. Leather Goods

Leather Goods
Image Courtesy of: Sekmous
The Turks take great pride in making high quality, affordable leather goods - from coats and jackets to purses and belts. All leather items in Turkey are handmade and, thus, each one is unique. This means that two jackets of the same size might fit slightly differently. Also, if you can’t find something that is just what you’re looking for, you can have an item custom made. Generally, if it's similar to a product that they are already producing, the extra cost would be minimal, if any at all.

One of the most convenient places to explore goods and prices is the leather section (Kürkcüler Çarşisi) of the Grand Bazaar. Leather belts here start at 20TL and jackets are around 500TL apiece, depending on size, style, type of leather, etc. The Grand Bazaar is located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. This is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. It is open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm, closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Leather section (Kürkcüler Çarşisi) of the Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed

16. Sports Clothing

Sports Clothing
Turks are passionate about football. You cannot walk down a single street in Istanbul without seeing some kind of football paraphernalia. The most popular teams are the red and gold Galatasaray, the navy blue and yellow Fenerbahce, and the black and white Besiktas. The rivalry between these three is intense, especially between Galatasaray and Fenerbahce. You can see many Turks sporting their colors with pride rather often. If you want to follow suit, you can easily outfit yourself with everything, from scarves to hats to towels to jerseys. Prices range from 20TL to 50TL for most items.

All teams’ sports jerseys can be bought on the Grand Bazaar, located near Sultanahmet at the Beyazit tram station. This is one of the world’s largest and oldest covered markets. It is open Monday – Saturday from 9am to 7pm, closed Sundays and Bank Holidays.
Where to find it:
Grand Bazaar, Divan Bazaar, Cankurtaran Mh., Tevkifhane Sk 1, Istanbul, Turkey
Operation Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9am-7pm; Sunday: Closed; Bank Holidays: Closed
Buy It on Amazon:

Other Interesting Souvenirs from Turkey


If traveling to Turkey is not on your immediate agenda, or you simply can't afford an extra space in your luggage, fortunately, these days, you can find a wide selection of authentic and truly interesting Turkish souvenirs online. Presented here are some of the Turkish products sought by foreign visitors, now available online for your convenience.

1. Turkish Spices - No Turkish food is a go without a proper mix of spices. Seasoning is paramount in Turkish cuisine, whether you cook chicken, lamb, beef, fish, stews, soups, BBQ or salads. A perfect combination of herbs – to ensure proper Turkish flavor – includes red and black pepper, salt, mint, cumin, and of course, dried spearmint. Having these in your kitchen will inevitably transform any ordinary dish into an incredibly delicious one and sometimes may even help reduce symptoms of muscle spasms, stomach aches or other ailments. All these spices originate from plants, some of which are used completely or only certain parts of, such as flowers, roots, barks, leaves, stems or seeds.

2. Mosaic Lamps - Illustrious lamps, hand-crafted by experienced artisans in a unique Turkish style, featuring a mosaic shade of precisely-cut pieces of glass, carefully put together to produce a warm ambiance for a romantic intrigue. Truly stylish and befitting any room, pub or coffee house decor. Great for mood or accent lighting.

3. Turkish Tea - Turkey is one of the largest tea markets in the world, where black tea is the most popular drink, even more popular than coffee. A special blend natural black tea from the Black Sea region of Turkey is an important part of the local culture. Truly iconic tea such as this is consumed hot, without milk, brewing all day in the traditional double teapots, all over Turkey: in households, shops or at social gatherings.

4. Onyx Items - Authentic Onyx is a great treat for the eyes of the beholder, exuding eminence in all its supremacy. Whether in the form of jewelry or kitchen sets, this stone adds a great deal of warmth to the surrounding space, revealing its innate beauty in an atmosphere of regal charisma at home or during a social gathering. A great gift idea, useful for any occasion.

5. Lemon Cologne - Lemon Cologne has many uses in Turkey, from repelling mosquitoes to easing the itching from bites to refreshing the body on a hot summer day and more. Known for its long lasting effect and sustainable scent, this traditional Turkish perfume brings chill, freshness and hygiene, all in one wrapping!

6. Turkish Bath Towels - Highly absorbent and very quickly drying, lightweight and compact (much thinner than a typical terry towel), Turkish bath towels are perfect travel companions. Equally great for bathrooms, pools, spas, beaches, sport facilities or baby care, these towels are 100% cotton woven on looms, and have been in use to cover bodies at Turkish steam baths (hammams) for almost 600 years. Their size is just right to wrap yourself in a total comfort!

7. Turkish Coffee Pot - Traditional Turkish coffee pot (cezve), hammered from a single sheet of copper, is designed to make a perfect cup of Turkish coffee. Coming in many different forms, cezve's body is always completely solid hammered copper with non-reactive tin linings on the inside, which makes it very convenient to use, no special care needed, and durable enough to last you for decades – whether you use it on electric or gas stove, hot sand, or open fire. The refined style of cezve is a great fit for any kitchen!

8. Ottoman Style Slippers - Traditional Ottoman-style slippers usually come with the gold embroidery, and are characterized by a raised tip. Very lightweight, they are made of velvet and metallic yarn. Exotic as it gets, these slippers will make a great gift for Christmas or many other occasions!

Get GPSmyCity App for IOS or Android
You can read offline thousands of travel articles like this one in the "GPSmyCity: Walks and Articles with Offline Maps" app on iTunes App Store or Google Play. The apps also offer GPS navigation to guide you to the places featured in the articles.
Download City Maps and Walks app for IOS   Download City Maps and Walks app for Android

Istanbul Walking Tours

Churches Walking Tour

Churches Walking Tour

Constantinople was a center for religion and the orthodox Christianity for over a millennium and even after the Ottomans came many Christians remained in the city. There are many churches in Istanbul and each of them has its uniqueness.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.7 km
Asian Part Walking Tour

Asian Part Walking Tour

Istanbul, Turkey's wealthiest and biggest city is split by the Bosphorus in two parts - European and Asian. In this tour you can experience the eastern side and feel the true spirit of the Orient with small, crowded streets and countless mosques.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.1 km
City Orientation Walk

City Orientation Walk

Istanbul, Turkey's main city, straddling the Bosphorus Strait to bridge gap between Europe and Asia, is an ancient metropolis embracing cultural influences of many civilizations that once flourished on this land. The Blue Mosque in Sultanahmet part of the Old Town, the Roman-era Hippodrome, and the iconic Byzantine Hagia Sophia are just some of the multiple historic landmarks adorning the city. To see these and other notable attractions of Istanbul, follow this orientation walk.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.4 km