Shopping in Beijing: 18 Travel Mementos

Shopping in Beijing: 18 Travel Mementos

Today, it is safe to assume that 9 out of 10 souvenirs worldwide (regardless of the country) are made in China, the workshop of the world. But how about shopping for souvenirs in China itself and Beijing, in particular? Presented here are some of the traditional Chinese-made goods, initially destined for Chinese users, but nowadays also seen as cool souvenirs picked by the Chinese experts for those non-Chinese who might want to have some of these in their homes as a piece of true China...
Image Courtesy of: Bruce Tuten

1. Yixing Clay Teapots

Yixing Clay Teapots
Yixing clay is a traditional style of tea pottery that has been in practice in China since the 15th century. Yixing teapots are meant primarily for black, oolong or pu'er teas, but may be used for green and white teas as well. They are highly appreciated for their unique ability to absorb the flavor of the tea once made in it and then "pass it on" to the next tea made afterwards. This is why one pot is usually used for a single type of tea only. If it has been used for years to make pu'er tea and then another kind of tea is put in, it will have the taste of pu'er tea. These pots may be washed only with boiled water, because if soap or another cleaning agent is applied, the pot will retain its taste and the tea will taste like soap afterwards. Since Yixing clay teapots are highly appreciated, they tend to be more expensive than regular teapots; the price of one is approximately $30 to $40, but you may also find Yixing teapots costing up to $1,000.
Where to find it:
Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com
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Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

2. “Inside Painted” Snuff Bottles

“Inside Painted” Snuff Bottles
Originally, snuff bottles were small containers used for carrying powdered tobacco during the Qing Dynasty period. After the establishment of the People's Republic of China, snuff bottles were no longer produced. Usually they were made of glass, but other materials, such as porcelain, ivory, jade, tortoiseshell, wood, metal and ceramic, were also applied. The bottles were both simple and beautifully decorated; the most prized ones were those painted on the inside surface of the glass. Nowadays, replicas of snuff bottles are produced and available at most souvenir shops and museum gift shops. Original Qing Dynasty snuff bottles may also be found, but they are rare and very expensive. Replica “inside painted” snuff bottles can be bought at prices ranging from $50 to $140 apiece, maybe more, depending on the material used.
Where to find it:
Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.

AIKA International Collections Exchange Market
Address: 31 West Road North Third Ring, Haidian District, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 8:30-16:30
Phone: 010-67741869
Website: http://www.ajsc.cn/
Buy It on Amazon:
Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

3. Beijing Palace Lantern

Beijing Palace Lantern
Beijing Palace Lanterns are six sided, ornate lanterns, embedded with painted silk or glass panes. These lanterns appeared under the Ming Dynasty and, at first, were only used at the imperial palace. However, later these became quite popular among the general population of the city. People placed them in their houses as luxurious items. Colored lanterns were hung outdoors in order to bring luck to the household and ward off evil spirits. Nowadays, however, the Chinese prefer modern decorations and the demand for palace lanterns has decreased dramatically. These lanterns may be seen mostly during Chinese festivals and in temples. The price for a Beijing Palace Lantern can also be a bit steep, between $60 and $700.
Where to find it:
Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.

AIKA International Collections Exchange Market
Address: 31 West Road North Third Ring, Haidian District, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 8:30-16:30
Phone: 010-67741869
Website: http://www.ajsc.cn/

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com
Buy It on Amazon:
Offline reading and travel directions:
You can carry this article in your mobile device to read offline and create a self-guided walk to visit the venues featured herein with the GPSmyCity App (available on iTunes App Store or Google Play Store).

4. Chinese Jewelry

Chinese Jewelry
Chinese jewelry is mainly made of jade, gold, silver and pearls; silver being the dominant metal in early Chinese jewelry. The most prized gems used in Chinese jewelry were, of course, jade, followed by pearls. The dominant motifs of Chinese jewelry are the dragon and the phoenix. The dragon symbolizes the Chinese emperor and the phoenix symbolizes the Chinese empress. The most common items in Chinese jewelry were earrings. In China, jewelry was worn by both men and women alike in order to demonstrate nobility and wealth. Nowadays, a large variety of Chinese jewelry made of different materials is available. Prices range from $30 to over $700.
Where to find it:
Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.
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5. Cloisonne Objects

Cloisonne Objects
Cloisonne objects are teapots, cups, vases, jewelry and other items made according to the cloisonne technique. Cloisonne is a unique form of art which appeared in Beijing under the Yuan Dynasty. The color process for cloisonne items was improved during the Ming period. Under the Qing dynasty, cloisonne improved and reached its artistic peak. Nowadays, the cloisonne technique is associated with the sculpture of wood, jade, ivory and lacquer. Cloisonne is still quite popular in China and there is a large variety of cloisonne items available, starting with tables and vases and ending with candy boxes and earrings. Depending on the item you intend to buy, the prices can range from $15 to several hundred dollars.
Where to find it:
Yaxiu Market
Address: 58 Gongti Bei Lu, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:30-21:00
Phone: +86 10 6416 8945

Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com
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6. Eight Treasures Ink-pad

Eight Treasures Ink-pad
Eight Treasures Ink-pad, featuring eight valuable ingredients, such as musk, plum, cinnabar, vermilion hue, natural jade and preserved oils, was invented in 1683. It was special use stationery at the imperial court, as well as being preferred by painters and calligraphy professionals. The Eight Treasures Ink-pad has kept the characteristics of ancient Chinese ink-pads, the process of production still involves over 30 separate steps and, when ready, it is left to sit for 6-10 months before being used. Nowadays, these ink-pads are used for historical records or signing of important contracts. The prices for an Eight Treasure Ink-pad range from $20 to $80.
Where to find it:
Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Rongbaozhai Bookshop
Address: 19 Liulichang West Street, Xicheng, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-17:30
Phone: +86 10 6303 6090
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7. Chinese Tea

Chinese Tea
The Chinese were the first to brew tea leaves; according to a legend, it was accidentally discovered by Emperor Shennong in 2737 BC when a tea leaf fell into the water the emperor was boiling. Tea is considered to be one of the seven necessities of Chinese life and has a very long history in China. There are four categories of Chinese tea (green, white, black and oolong) and approximately 500 tea varieties, most of which are not exported and can only be found in China. A typical kind of Chinese tea is Jasmine tea made from green tea or white tea and jasmine flowers. Jasmine tea is the most famous scented tea in China. The Chinese take tea very seriously and the prices for their tea vary from $15 to $190 per pack.
Where to find it:
Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Hong Zhi Teashop
Address: 10 Maliandao Chaye Jie, Xuanwu District, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 8:00-22:00
Phone: +86 10 6342 4406

Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/
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8. Chinese Ceramics

Chinese Ceramics
Ceramic-ware has been produced in China since pre-dynastic times and is considered one of the most important forms of Chinese art. Ranging from construction materials to sophisticated porcelain used at the imperial palace, this art-form has evolved a lot over the centuries, with each new dynasty bringing new styles, technologies, forms and decorations. But the most notable changes in the production of Chinese ceramics were brought by the Tang, Song, Ming and Qing dynasties. Chinese porcelain is usually made of a mixture of kaolin, pottery stone, feldspar and quartz. There is a great variety of Chinese ceramic-ware, such as dishes, tea pots and bowls, vases, statues, etc., currently available. In Beijing, one can find a large selection of beautiful ceramic items to choose from, with prices ranging from $30 to over $1000 apiece, depending on the quality and age of the item.
Where to find it:
Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.

Spin Ceramics
Address: 6 Fang Yuan Xi Lu, Chao Yang Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 10:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6437 8649
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9. Chinese Silk

Chinese Silk
The history of silk began in ancient China when, according to a legend, Empress Leizu made the discovery as a silk cocoon fell into her tea. At first, silk was only reserved for use at the imperial court and, on occasions, as a gift from royalty. Later, it spread rapidly and became a very popular luxury fabric. Silk was in great demand and, for a while, China was the only country to supply it. However, in time, silk production began in the neighboring Korea and India, as well. Nowadays, there are a great variety of silk-made articles available, from clothing to household items; and while sometimes buying genuine silk garments may prove to be quite expensive, it is always a good idea to buy silk household accessories, like cushions or bags. Silk items cost from $40.
Where to find it:
Qian Xiang Yi
Address: 5 Zhubaoshi Street, Xicheng, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-20:30
Phone: 86-10-63014732

Yaxiu Market
Address: 58 Gongti Bei Lu, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:30-21:00
Phone: +86 10 6416 8945

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/
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10. Beijing Lord Rabbit Figurines

Beijing Lord Rabbit Figurines
Lord Rabbit figurines are a typical symbol of local culture in Beijing, representing happiness and good luck. It is considered that Lord Rabbit appeared during the Ming dynasty; apparently, at that time the locals made clay rabbit figurines for worship. Later, during the Qing dynasty, Lord Rabbit figurines became a children's toy. According to one of the legends, Lord Rabbit was a maker of elixirs who was sent by the Chinese goddess of the moon to save the people of Beijing from a plague. After the plague was driven away, the people wanted to express their gratitude by offering her gifts; they began making and worshiping clay rabbit figurines during every Mid-Autumn Festival. Nowadays, Lord Rabbit figurines can be found in any shape and decorated in a multitude of ways. Lord Rabbit figurines are very typical of Beijing and have no equivalent anywhere else in China.
Where to find it:
Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Bannerman Tang's Toys and Crafts
Address: 38 Guozijian, Dongcheng, Beijing, China
Phone: +86 10 8404 7179‎

Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.

11. Beijing Paper Cuts

Beijing Paper Cuts
Paper cutting has a very long history in China. It has been practiced since ancient times and the invention of paper. Originally, available mostly at the royal court, from the 7th century up to the 13th, paper cutting became largely popular during Chinese festivals. Initially, the paper cuts also had religious meanings and roles, however, nowadays, they are purely decorative. They are used to adorn windows, walls, doors, mirrors, lanterns or given away as presents. Paper cuts are very popular in Beijing; they are only made by hand and usually are very cheap. Prices range from $0.15 to $16.
Where to find it:
Zhiyixuan
Address: 75 South Chizi Street, Dongcheng, Beijing, China

Papercut Store
Address: 3 Guozijian Street, Dongcheng, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 10:00-17:30
Phone: +86 158 1020 8225

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com
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12. Neiliansheng Cloth Shoes

Neiliansheng Cloth Shoes
All-cloth shoes, sole included, have been traditionally worn by most Chinese officials for centuries; and for the last 150 or so years Neiliansheng has made, what is considered by most, the best cloth shoes. Neiliansheng was established in 1853 and specializes in producing and selling cloth shoes. Their footwear was highly appreciated by top officials from the imperial court of the past and the leaders of modern China alike. The shoes have been popular due to their bright black satin and 32 layers of cloth used for the sole. Neiliansheng shoes were considered luxury items during imperial times and, nowadays, are considered a form of art. Even if these kind of shoes are usually more expensive than others (prices range between $23 and $51), they are still very popular.
Where to find it:
Neiliansheng Shoes Industry
Address: 53 Dong'anmen Street, Dongcheng, Beijing, China
Phone: +86 10 5120 9526
Website: http://www.nls1853.com/

Neiliansheng Shoes Store
Address: 34 Dashilan West Street, Xicheng, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-21:00
Phone: +86 10 6301 4863 ‎
Website: http://www.nls1853.com/

13. Chinese Chop

Chinese Chop
The Chinese chop is a signature stamp made of stone or wood, sometimes metal or ivory. It is usually either square or circular in shape and almost always stamped with red ink. The chop was invented during the Shang dynasty and has since become an important part of Chinese culture. Traditionally, all business transactions had to be signed with a chop and to date no business can be done without the use of a chop, when it is necessary to sign any agreement or contract. The Chinese chop is also used by Chinese artists in order to sign their works. Anyone can have their names translated into Chinese characters in order to make such a chop. The price for a Chinese chop is within $10, but it may cost more if the chop is made of precious stone.
Where to find it:
Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.
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14. Zhongguo Jie (Chinese knots)

Zhongguo Jie (Chinese knots)
Chinese knots are the result of a decorative handicraft which appeared and developed during the Tang and Song Dynasties. Chinese knots are considered traditional decorations. They were very popular during the Ming and Qing dynasties. It was during the Qing dynasty that Chinese knotting became a widespread art form and reached the peak of success. Later however, between 1912 and 1976, the art of Chinese knotting was almost lost. Nowadays, Chinese knots are mostly seen during ceremonies and traditional holidays. They are given to people to wish them health and happiness. The prices for Chinese knots are up to $30.
Where to find it:
Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/

Yaxiu Market
Address: 58 Gongti Bei Lu, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:30-21:00
Phone: +86 10 6416 8945
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15. Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scrolls
In China, calligraphy is considered a true form of art, similar to painting, and sometimes can be valued even higher than paintings. Calligraphy has developed since the appearance of Chinese characters (approximately 4000 BC) and has been permanently improved over the centuries. Since calligraphy was considered an art form, it was only natural that works were produced in order to showcase it, often in the form of wall hanging scrolls. Typically, wall scrolls may have one or several Chinese characters painted on them, or they may have signs of the Chinese zodiac. They are available at affordable prices, starting at $10-$30, but may be more expensive – over $100.
Where to find it:
Panjiayuan Flea Market
Address: Panjiayuan Road, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Thursday: 8:30-18:00; Saturday-Sunday: 4:30-18:00
Phone: +86 10 6710 0298
Website: http://www.panjiayuan.com/
Note: The best time to visit Panjiayuan Flea Market is on weekends.

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Rongbaozhai Bookshop
Address: 19 Liulichang West Street, Xicheng, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-17:30
Phone: +86 10 6303 6090
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16. Beijing Dough Figurines

Beijing Dough Figurines
Beijing dough figurines are a traditional handicraft, they are made of wheat and glutinous rice flour, and carved with a small bamboo knife. The dough figurines have a high artistic value for the locals and may be compared to Chinese sculpture. Although an ancient handicraft, it hasn't received widespread attention until the Qing dynasty period, and only became truly popular at the beginning of the 21st century. The figurines are made on different occasions throughout the year and are used as gifts for children. Please keep in mind that there are edible and inedible dough toys. These can be found in abundance at temple fairs during the Spring Festival.
Where to find it:
Xindong'an Market
Address: 138 Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng, Beijing, China, 100006
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-21:30
Phone: +86 10 5817 6688
Website: http://www.beijingapm.cn/

17. Chinese Traditional Clothing

Chinese Traditional Clothing
Clothing styles in China, just like cultural trends, changed with each dynasty. During these changes different aspects of the Chinese culture evolved and reflected in the way people dressed as well. The two most known traditional Chinese styles of clothing are - Han clothing, worn previous to the Qing Dynasty; and Manchu clothing, worn during and after the Qing Dynasty. It was during this dynasty that the modern version of traditional clothing, like the Chinese long gown for men (changshan) and the qipao for women (cheongsam), appeared. After the abolition of imperial China, clothing styles changed again, reaching a peak during the Cultural Revolution, when everything related to the past imperial era was considered undesirable and, therefore, had to be dismissed. However, lately, traditional clothing has gained popularity once again and there is a general tendency to restore traditional Chinese culture all over China. Traditional Chinese clothing costs from $50 to over $100.
Where to find it:
Yaxiu Market
Address: 58 Gongti Bei Lu, Chaoyang, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:30-21:00
Phone: +86 10 6416 8945

Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Hongqiao Market – The Pearl Market
Address: 9 Tian Tan Lu, Dong Cheng Qu, Beijing, China
Operation hours: Monday-Sunday: 9:00-19:00
Phone: +86 10 6711 9130‎
Website: http://www.hongqiao-pearl-market.com/
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18. Er guo tou (Chinese Firewater)

Er guo tou (Chinese Firewater)
Er guo tou is a type of distilled beverage made of sorghum with a variable alcohol content, which can go up to 56%, hence the name Chinese Firewater. Er guo tou is an inexpensive and popular drink in Beijing, because of which it is often associated with the city. One of the most popular brands is Red Star, which may be found in most Beijing homes. Er guo tou is a clear, strong spirit and its production takes six months. The price for a bottle of Er guo tou is approximately $1.
Where to find it:
Friendship Store
Address: 17 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Chaoyang, Beijing, China, 100020
Phone: +86 10 6500 3311
Website: http://www.bjyysd.com.cn/
E-mail: bjyysdyw@sina.com

Other Interesting Souvenirs from China


If traveling to China is not on your immediate agenda, or you simply can't afford an extra space in your luggage, fortunately, these days, you can find a wide selection of authentic and truly interesting Chinese souvenirs online. Presented here are some of the Chinese products sought by foreign visitors, now available online for your convenience.

1. Mao Memorabilia - Coins, stamps, badges, mini-statues, paintings, photographs or other artifacts featuring the image of Mao Zedong have been in high demand and of doubled (sometimes even tripled) value, lately. If you or some of your friends are Chairman Mao's fans, a piece of Mao memorabilia may seem like a good souvenir option.

2. Sichuan Pepper - Sichuan pepper, or peppercorn, is a popular spice in Chinese cooking, originating from the Szechuan province. It is more of a citrus rather than pepper, really, and is widely used throughout Asia for braised dishes, pickled vegetables, and a whole variety of meats. It can also be ground to powder and mixed with salt to produce "pepper salt". A good thing to add to your favorite dishes and enjoy!

3. Chinese Snacks - The Chinese are big on food, and even more so on snacks! Among the myriads popular snacks available in China, there are some “classics” like Wei Long – a vegetarian spicy snack, and Taro Fish – a ready to eat snack that can also be fried with or without oil, for extra crispiness, and taken with noodles or in salad.

4. Traditional Hair Combs - Eye-catching accessory for a wedding ceremony, or just a graceful item to accentuate a women's beauty and elegance, the traditional Chinese hair comb is a perfect item to attract attention with. Hand-made and hand-painted, masterfully crafted of natural wood, the comb is a stylish (especially if Retro) piece of garment, easy to wear and to reveal one's extraordinary taste.

5. Chinese Kites - The tradition of making and flying kites in China goes back thousands of years. It is undoubtedly an entertaining outdoor activity for kids and adults alike, ideal for any open space, beach or park. Usually, the kites are created in the form of dragons or birds. The ultimate "tool" to build one's imagination, and a true must for any child.

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Beijing Walking Tours

Walking Tour: Popular Markets in Beijing

Walking Tour: Popular Markets in Beijing

Markets in Beijing are great places to get acquainted with locals. Many markets operate through the night so if you are out late enjoying the nightlife, don't forget to stop by to purchase unique items that are not found in shops or malls. Take the following tour to discover the most popular markets in Beijing:

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.3 km
Antiques Hunting Tour

Antiques Hunting Tour

While enjoying the city, make sure to check out our amazing tour, comprised of handpicked antique markets, filled with original, rare and beautiful items. Discover both the work of local craftsmen and articles that traveled from other countries and cultures.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.4 km
Self-guided Tour: Places of Worship, South-West Beijing

Self-guided Tour: Places of Worship, South-West Beijing

Beijing’s places of worship are some of the best links to the city's history. The unique churches, Buddhist and Taoist Temples, and beautiful Muslim Mosques all tell great tales of the history of Beijing. Many of them have been partially or completely destroyed over the years either structurally by wars, or internally by the changes of political power. Visit the most beautiful places of worship in Beijing in the next self-guided tour:

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 7.7 km