Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield

Lyceum Theatre, Sheffield

Two previous theaters have preceded the Lyceum Theatre at 55 Norfolk Street, Sheffield. In 1879 The Grand Varieties Theatre was built at that address. Originally conceived as a circus, the theatre was managed by comedian Dan Leno. The Grand burned down in 1893 and was replaced by the City Theatre.

In 1900, the Lyceum replaced the City Theatre. The Lyceum was designed by a theatre architect William George Robert Sprague. It had the traditional proscenium arch stage and is the last Edwardian theatre in Sheffield. A statue of Mercury, guardian of Borders and son of Zeus and Maia, balance on top of the theatre's large copper dome.

The Lyceum Theatre went through some hard times and narrowly escaped demolition in 1985. Sheffield entrepreneurs and the City Council rescued it. Today it is a venue for West End productions and local shows. It is a part of the Sheffield Theatres complex, together with the nearby Crucible Theatre and the Tanya Moiseiwitsch Playhouse.

Sprague's design provided for an audience of about 3,000 with stalls on three levels around the auditorium. The Lyceum Theatre reopened in December 1990 with three gala presentations by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, including the Broadway version of "The Pirates of Penzance" by Arthur Sullivan (music) and W.S.Gilbert (libretto). The Lyceum Theatre is home to the City's annual pantomime.

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Lyceum Theatre on Map

Sight Name: Lyceum Theatre
Sight Location: Sheffield, England (See walking tours in Sheffield)
Sight Type: Attraction/Landmark
Guide(s) Containing This Sight:

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