Royal Palace, Oslo

Royal Palace, Oslo (must see)

The Royal Palace or Slottet in Oslo was built in the first half of the 19th century as the Norwegian residence of the French-born King Charles III of Norway, who reigned as king of Norway and Sweden. The palace is the official residence of the current Norwegian monarch while the Crown Prince resides at Skaugum in Asker west of Oslo.

Construction began on the palace in 1825; it took almost twenty-five years to complete. The building process, overseen by local architect Hans Linstow, was fraught with political difficulties. The government refused further funding for the expensive project at one point, due to the king’s efforts to tie Sweden and Norway closer together. Despite proceeding with a simpler, three storey neo-Classical design, the palace was still unfinished when Charles III died in 1844. His son and heir, Oscar I, became the first resident five years later.

Since public tours began in 2002, the general public has been able to view and appreciate the renovation and splendor that the palace now boasts. The daily changing of the guards has become a popular tourist attraction in recent years. Additionally, in 2017, the former palace stables were renovated and converted into a multipurpose art venue which was named Dronning Sonja KunstStall. The building will be used as an art gallery, museum and concert hall and is also open to the public.

Guided tours run all afternoon through the summer months, though they are mostly in Norwegian. English language tours take place at 12pm, 2pm, 2:20pm and 4pm each day. Tickets for the guided tours are available online from 1 March each year.

Why You Should Visit:
Not a palace in the tradition of older European monarchies but still elegant and beautifully decorated with many of the objects you'd expect to see in a royal residence.

Tip:
Changing of the royal guards is at 1:30 pm daily. You can always politely approach one of the guard soldiers and take a nice photo or have a chat with them :)
The garden are peaceful and freely accessible – you can have a picnic over there and quietly sit down in the midst of nature.

Opening Hours (during Summer):
Mon-Thu: 11am-5pm; Fri: 12-5pm; Sat-Sun: 10am-5pm
Note that the 2018 season lasted from 23 June until 18 August.
Sight description based on wikipedia

This sight is featured in a self-guided walking tour of Oslo, Norway within the mobile app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" which can be downloaded from iTunes App Store or Google Play. Please download the app to your mobile phone or tablet for travel directions for visiting this sight. The app turns your mobile device to a personal tour guide and it works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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Royal Palace on Map

Sight Name: Royal Palace
Sight Location: Oslo, Norway
Sight Type: Attraction/Landmark
Guide(s) containing this sight: Sentrum Walk  

Walking Tours in Oslo, Norway

Create Your Own Walk in Oslo

Create Your Own Walk in Oslo

Creating your own self-guided walk in Oslo is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Pipervika Bay Walk

Pipervika Bay Walk

Norway's capital, Oslo, is a magnificent city where you will find an eclectic mix of architectural styles. Be sure to explore its lovely streets and wonderful museums that are considered to be some of the best in the world, as well as original restaurants and cafes located in the Pipervika Bay.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
Sentrum Walk

Sentrum Walk

Sentrum, meaning city-center, is located on the southeast side of the city near the inner Oslofjord. The district is dominated by high buildings and valuable tourist attractions. Take this tour to visit Ibsen Museum, as well as Stortinget, National Theater, University of Oslo, National Gallery, Oslo Cathedral and many others.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.2 km
Hanshaugen Religious Walk

Hanshaugen Religious Walk

Learn more about the religious life of Oslo by taking this walking tour of the city’s most important sacred sights. An interesting variety of design, including Protestant and Catholic churches, can be found in Oslo Hanshaugen borough.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.4 km
Frogner Walk

Frogner Walk

Frogner is an Oslo borough, located in the West End part of the Norwegian capital, renowned for its exceptional residential and retail facilities. The area is named after Frogner Manor, the site of which is now occupied by the eponymous Frogner Park. Centrally located, this is one of the priciest districts in Oslo, abounding in parks, marinas and pretty architecture. Take this tour to explore the most interesting sites of the borough, including Frogner Church, Oslo City Museum, Vigeland Sculpture Park and more.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.3 km
Kvadraturen Walk

Kvadraturen Walk

Kvadraturen is the oldest quarter of Oslo. It is located in the very heart of the Sentrum borough and offers plenty of tourist spots to visit. Take this tour to explore the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Gamle Raadhus, Film Museum and many others.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.7 km
Grünerløkka and St. Hanshaugen Walk

Grünerløkka and St. Hanshaugen Walk

Grünerløkka and St. Hanshaugen used to be small villages not far from the main settlement, then called Christiania. Today these neighborhoods are perfect for exploring historical and cultural heritage of Norway capital. This tour will guide you through the St. Hanshaugen Park, Zoologisk Museum, Botanisk Hage og Museum and many others.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.6 km

Useful Travel Guides for Planning Your Trip


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