University of New Mexico Walking Tour (Self Guided), Albuquerque

Founded in 1889, The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public research university in New Mexico. Its main campus is located in Albuquerque and it has branch campuses in Gallup, Los Alamos, Rio Rancho, Taos, and Los Lunas. This self-guided walking tour takes you to see the main attractions and university facilities on its Albuquerque campus.
How it works: Download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

Download The GPSmyCity App

Download 'GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities' app for IOS   Download 'GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities' app for Android

University of New Mexico Walking Tour Map

Guide Name: University of New Mexico Walking Tour
Guide Location: USA » Albuquerque (See other walking tours in Albuquerque)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 12
Tour Duration: 2 Hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.6 Km or 2.2 Miles
Author: doris
Sight(s) Featured in This Guide:
  • University of New Mexico Bookstore
  • Johnson Gymnasium Arena
  • University of New Mexico Art Museum
  • Carlisle Gymnasium
  • Duck Pond at UNM
  • Zimmerman Library
  • President's House (University of New Mexico)
  • Alumni Memorial Chapel
  • Maxwell Museum of Anthropology
  • Estufa
  • Hodgin Hall
  • Central Avenue and Nob Hill
1
University of New Mexico Bookstore

1) University of New Mexico Bookstore

The University of New Mexico bookstore is located on the University of New Mexico campus next to Yale Park. The UNM bookstore offers books, course material and technology for students, but it is also a popular spot for tourists. Visitors to Albuquerque can buy UNM themed clothing, artwork, accessories and even architecture kits.

The history of the bookstore is unique in that it was not well established until more than 100 years after the founding of the university. When the first UNM building was constructed in 1889, the bookstore was placed in an army barracks.

The bookstore moved to several places around the campus before finally ending up in the basement of the Student Union in the 1950s. Some 20 years later it moved to the campus's biology building. It would stay in that spot for another 20 years. The current building has been the home of the UNM bookstore since 1996.
2
Johnson Gymnasium Arena

2) Johnson Gymnasium Arena

Johnson Gymnasium is a 4,000-seat multi-purpose arena on the campus of the University of New Mexico. It opened in 1957 and was the home venue of the New Mexico Lobos basketball team until The Pit opened in 1966. Today, Johnson Gymnasium is the home floor for the Lobo volleyball team. The gym is named after former Lobos basketball coach, Roy Johnson.

On March 18, 2015, the arena hosted a New Mexico Lobos women's basketball game for the first time when the Lobos took on North Dakota in the first round of the Women's Basketball Invitational. The team's normal venue, The Pit, was not available due to a conflicting Professional Bull Riders event. The Lobos won the game and advanced to the second round where they were defeated by Oral Roberts at the same venue.
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
University of New Mexico Art Museum

3) University of New Mexico Art Museum

The University of New Mexico Art Museum (sometimes referred to as the University Art Museum or UNM Art Museum) is an art museum at the University of New Mexico. The museum's permanent collection includes nearly 30,000 objects, making it the largest collection of fine art in New Mexico.

In the early years following the opening of the museum in 1963, significant exhibitions were held of the work of Georgia O'Keeffe, Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, John Marin, and other Modernists.

Van Deren Coke was the founding director of the Art Museum. Robert O. Parks was another early Art Museum director.[3][4]

Georgia O'Keeffe had included the University of New Mexico and another New Mexico museum in her will of 1979, but in a codicil signed in 1984 soon before her death deleted it. An agreement between the State of New Mexico and Juan Hamilton, O'Keeffe's companion and executor of the will, was made in 1986, when the state agreed to drop any challenge to the will in exchange for several O'Keeffe paintings.
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Carlisle Gymnasium

4) Carlisle Gymnasium

Carlisle Gymnasium is an indoor arena on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It was the home of the New Mexico Lobos basketball team from its opening in 1928 until the completion of the larger Johnson Gymnasium in 1957, and was also the original venue of the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. The building currently houses the university's Elizabeth Waters Center for Dance.

The building was designed by the firm of Gaastra, Gladding and Johnson in the Pueblo Revival architectural style, which was the de facto official style for all new buildings on campus. In a novel application of the style, the architects used stepped massing, vigas, and other Pueblo details to mask the rectilinear form of the gymnasium. The building was completed at a cost of approximately $85,000 and was named after Hugh Carlisle, a UNM student who died in World War I. Carlisle Gymnasium was added to the New Mexico State Register of Cultural Properties and the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Duck Pond at UNM

5) Duck Pond at UNM

The Duck Pond at UNM (University of Mexico) is a popular relaxation spot for students and local residents, particularly in the warmer months.
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Zimmerman Library

6) Zimmerman Library

The Zimmerman Library is located on the north side of the University of New Mexico's Smith Plaza. It is a four-floor library that houses materials relating to education, humanities, social sciences and government.

This was the main library for the campus when it was built in 1938. It was designed by John Gaw Meem in a Spanish-Pueblo Revival architectural style. Meem's design was based on Spanish missions in the area along with Pueblo architecture. Many of the interior features were designed by local Native American artists in order to stay true to the Pueblo influence.

One of the most distinctive features of the Zimmerman Library is its nine-story tower. This tower was built to provide a home to the collections, but it is no longer in use. The library provides occasional tours of the tower, but these are generally reserved for students.

Visitors can access the library from 9 AM through 6 PM during weekdays and from 1 PM through 6 PM on Sundays. The Zimmerman Library is closed on Saturdays.
7
President's House (University of New Mexico)

7) President's House (University of New Mexico)

President's House on the University of New Mexico campus was built in 1930. It is now known as University House. It was designed by architect Miles Brittelle in Spanish Pueblo Revival style. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

"The President's house is an adobe residence in the Spanish Pueblo Revival style. It has vertical metal casement windows with Watson wood lintels and exposed vigas in the second-story. It has a rustic second-story balcony formed by vigas and supported by a log beam and posts. This building has had several additions since its original construction in 1930. All additions were in the Pueblo style and uphold the integrity of the original building. The building was designed by Miles Brittelle and built in 1930. John Gaw Meem designed an addition to the house in 1952. The building has a shape that resembles multiple squares and rectangles."

"Statement of Significance, Criterion C: The President's House is one of six buildings on the campus of the University of New Mexico included in this nomination. The President's House is significant because it is an excellent example of residential Spanish Pueblo Revival style architecture. The architectural quality was considered so good that the building was used as a representative example of Spanish Pueblo Revival Style architecture in a major survey of American building styles. Miles Brittelle was the architect on the original building in 1930. Brittelle may have been working for Trost and Trost at the time he designed this building (Brittelle worked for Trost and Trost, no dates available, and then was in partnership with Trost and Trost from 1932 to 1934). John Gaw Meem designed an addition to the house in 1952. Although there has been various additions and renovations to the building, all additions have been true to the style and architectural integrity of the original building."
Sight description based on wikipedia
8
Alumni Memorial Chapel

8) Alumni Memorial Chapel

The Alumni Memorial Chapel is a distinctive building on the University of New Mexico campus. It is a popular space for weddings, celebrations and other special events due to the beauty of the building and its gardens.

The chapel was built in 1962 as a tribute to UNM alumni who were lost during service in the nation's wars. Each name is listed on the south wall of the chapel. The garden also has commemorative tiles that bear the images of alumni.

John Gaw Meem was the architect who designed the Alumni Memorial Chapel. Born in Brazil and based out of Santa Fe, Meem designed a number of buildings on the UNM campus in his distinctive southwestern style. As Meem retired in 1956, the Alumni Memorial Chapel was his last official design.

Visitors tourinf the interior of the chapel will see carillon bells that were donated by the Chi Omega sorority, an altar screen crafted by numerous southwest artists and a pipe organ with 432 pipes.
9
Maxwell Museum of Anthropology

9) Maxwell Museum of Anthropology

The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology was founded in 1932 as the Museum of Anthropology of the University of New Mexico, becoming the first public museum in Albuquerque. The museum was created to house and display the growing collection of artifacts gathered from field schools of archaeological research associated with the UNM Anthropology Department, the School of American Research, and the Museum of New Mexico.

Exhibits were first situated in UNM's Rodey Hall, which was demolished in 1971. The museum moved to Scholes Hall in 1935, then to the current site in 1961. In 1972 a major construction project expanded museum facilities, which was funded by the philanthropists Dorothy and Gilbert Maxwell. The museum was renamed in their honor and since then, it has been recognized as an important regional museum and a nationally known research center.

The museum has five exhibit areas that host permanent and changing exhibits which express the human cultural experience. The Ancestors permanent exhibit traces human evolution over four million years and features life-size models of human ancestors. The People of the Southwest permanent exhibit depicts eleven thousand years of the cultural heritage of the American Southwest and features artifacts from Mimbres, Ancestral Puebloan, and Puebloan cultures, as well as displays on UNM field work in New Mexico, which includes a reconstruction of an excavation at Chaco Canyon.

The museum's North Gallery, Bawden Gallery (named after Garth Bawden, museum director 1985-2005), and the Ortiz Center Gathering Space (named for the late Alfonso Ortiz, a noted UNM anthropology professor) host changing exhibits featuring artifacts from the extensive museum collection as well as traveling exhibits. The museum's courtyard features a 46-foot (14 m)-high totem pole brought to the museum from British Columbia in 1941.
Sight description based on wikipedia
10
Estufa

10) Estufa

The Estufa is a historic structure on the University of New Mexico campus. An estufa [Sp., a stove, a warm room. Cf. Stove] is an assembly room in a dwelling of the Pueblo Indians (i.e. a kiva), per Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, 1998. It was built in 1907–08 by a local social fraternity and has served since 1915 as the primary meeting location of the university's Pi Kappa Alpha chapter. The building's history is steeped in fraternity lore and supposedly no woman has ever seen its interior. It is listed in both the New Mexico State Register of Cultural Properties and the National Register of Historic Places.

The Estufa is modeled after a kiva, a ceremonial meeting place used by the Pueblo people. It has thick adobe walls and contains a single windowless room with seating around the edges. Construction of the building was guided by university president William G. Tight, who promoted the use of Pueblo Revival architecture on campus. The Estufa was one of the first buildings in New Mexico to employ this style.
Sight description based on wikipedia
11
Hodgin Hall

11) Hodgin Hall

Hodgin Hall, previously known at various times as the University Building, Main Building, or Administration Building, is a historic building on the University of New Mexico campus in Albuquerque. Completed in 1892, it was the first building constructed on the UNM campus and the university's only building for almost a decade. The building was originally designed by Jesse Wheelock in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, but structural problems with the building's roof gave university president William Tight the opportunity to have it remodeled in his preferred Pueblo Revival style in 1908.

The remodeled building features stepped, asymmetrical massing, stuccoed walls, vigas, and other details characteristic of traditional Pueblo and mission architecture. As one of the first Pueblo Revival buildings in New Mexico, Hodgin Hall helped to establish the style both at the university and regionally. The building was slated for demolition in the 1970s but was preserved and restored through an alumni fundraising effort. Since 1983, it has housed the university's Alumni Association and Alumni Relations offices. Hodgin Hall is listed in both New Mexico State Register of Cultural Properties and the National Register of Historic Places.
Sight description based on wikipedia
12
Central Avenue and Nob Hill

12) Central Avenue and Nob Hill

Nob Hill is a neighborhood in Albuquerque consisting of a commercial district along Central Avenue (former U.S. Route 66) and surrounding residential areas. Located just east of the University of New Mexico, the neighborhood was developed between about 1925 and 1950 and has since become a popular tourist and shopping destination. Known for its eclectic mix of mostly locally owned businesses, Nob Hill has been described as "the heart of Albuquerque's Route 66 culture and also its hippest, funkiest retail and entertainment district". The neighborhood is named after Nob Hill in San Francisco.

Nob Hill's commercial strip began to develop in the 1930s, spurred both by the growth of the surrounding neighborhoods and by the increasing number of travelers on Central Avenue. The latter became increasingly important after 1937, when Central was designated as U.S. Route 66. The presence of both travelers and local residents in the neighborhood resulted in a mix of businesses catering to the two different markets, including the Aztec Motel (1932), El Oriente Court (1935), Modern Auto Court (1937), Lobo Theater (1938), De Anza Motor Lodge (1939), and Jones Motor Company (also 1939).

Nob Hill is home to an eclectic mix of shops, galleries, bars, and restaurants, many of which are locally owned. There are also some chain stores, such as Buffalo Exchange and Starbucks. Until recently most of the commercial activity in the neighborhood was confined to the area west of Carlisle, but new development has been gradually expanding eastward along Central.
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Create Your Own Walk in Albuquerque

Create Your Own Walk in Albuquerque

Creating your own self-guided walk in Albuquerque is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Albuquerque Old Town Walk

Albuquerque Old Town Walk

Albuquerque has a history that dates as far back as 12,000 years ago. The presence of Paleo-Indians are evident in Sandia Cave. Over the years, the people who lived in the region began to farm and build pueblos for their homes. European settlers arrived the area in the 16th century.

The city of Albuquerque was officially established in 1706. New Mexico Governer Francisco Cuervo y Valdés named...  view more

Tour Duration: 1 Hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.5 Km or 0.9 Miles
Downtown Historical Buildings Walking Tour

Downtown Historical Buildings Walking Tour

The one-of-a-kind character of Albuquerque is the result of many different forces and centuries of history that have shaped the city. The core of Central Albuquerque is what most of the locals considered “downtown” – a place they lived, worked, shopped, governed and entertained themselves in for almost 80 years, since the arrival of the railroad in 1880.

The vibrant architectural...  view more

Tour Duration: 1 Hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.7 Km or 1.1 Miles