The French Revolution Landmarks Walking Tour, Paris

The French Revolution had a huge impact on France's history as it gave rise to a radical democratic republic and resulted in violence during the Reign of Terror. A lot of Paris' buildings were damaged beyond repair in the course of the Revolution. The sites they occupied are of a great historical value now. This guide is to highlight the landmarks of the French Revolution that remain.
You can follow this self-guided walking tour to explore the attractions listed below. How it works: download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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The French Revolution Landmarks Walking Tour Map

Guide Name: The French Revolution Landmarks Walking Tour
Guide Location: France » Paris (See other walking tours in Paris)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 7
Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 6.4 km
Author: karen
1
Place de la Bastille

1) Place de la Bastille

La Bastille, the notorious prison-fortress in Paris, was completely destroyed during the French Revolution. A square, known as Place de la Bastille, was built in its place to commemorate the revolutionary events of 1830 and to celebrate victory of democracy over tyranny. Special paving stones have been used to mark the original site of the fortress. Today, the square regularly hosts musical concerts and other open-air events. Due to its historical importance, the square has been the venue of many political demonstrations over the years, including the massive anti-CPE rally on March 28, 2006.

It is also home of the Bastille Opera, the Bastille subway station, and a section of the Canal Saint Martin. A 24 meter fountain, designed in the shape of an elephant, was once set in the square but removed in 1847. The only monument standing here is the Colonne de Juillet, a column commemorating the three glorious days of July 1830, during which King Louis-Philippe replaced King Charles X. The 52 meter (171 ft) column honors the 504 victims who fell during those three days, and is topped by the gilded statue of the Spirit of Liberty. A modern opera house, known as the Bastille Opera, was opened on July 14, 1989. By far one of the grandest opera buildings in the world, it seats up to 2700 spectators. The architect of the building sharply contrasting the surrounding area was Carlos Ott. His design was voted the best of the 750 entries submitted to an architectural contest. On your tour of Paris, make sure to visit this historic square and enjoy the sights and food in one of the nearby cafes.
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Place du Châtelet

2) Place du Châtelet

The Place du Châtelet is a public square in Paris, on the right bank of the river Seine. It lies at the north end of the Pont au Change, a bridge that connects the Île de la Cité, near the Palais de Justice and the Conciergerie, to the right bank. The name "Châtelet" refers to the stronghold, the Grand Châtelet, that guarded the northern end of the Pont au Change, containing the offices of the prévôt de Paris and a number of prisons, until it was demolished in 1802-10. At the square's center is La Fontaine du Palmier (Palm Tree Fountain), constructed in 1806 to 1808 by François-Jean Bralle (1750-1832) to celebrate French victories in battle. The palm trunk is surmounted by a gilded figure of the goddess, Victory, holding a laurel wreath in each upraised hand; the goddess figure stands on a base ornamented with bas-relief eagles.
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Pavillon de Flore

3) Pavillon de Flore

The Pavillon de Flore is a section of the Palais du Louvre in Paris, France. Its construction began in 1607, during the reign of Henry IV, and has had numerous renovations since. The Pavillon de Flore was built to extend the Grande Galerie, which formed the south face of the Palais du Louvre, to the Palais des Tuileries, thus linking the two palaces. During the French Revolution, the Pavillon de Flore, situated at the southwest corner of the Palais des Tuileries at the time, was renamed Pavillon de l'Égalité (House of Equality). Under its new name, it became the meeting point for several of the Committees of the period. Many other committees of the Revolutionary Government occupied the Palais des Tuileries (referred to by contemporaries as the Palace of the Nation) during the time of the National Convention. Notable occupiers included the Monetary Committee, the Account and Liquidation Examination Committee. However, the most famous was the Committee of Public Safety.
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Jardin des Tuileries

4) Jardin des Tuileries (must see)

The Tuileries Garden ('Jardin des Tuileries') is a public garden located between the Louvre Museum and the Place de la Concorde in Paris. On October 6, 1789, as the French Revolution began, King Louis XVI was brought against his will to the Tuileries Palace. The garden was closed to the public except in the afternoon. Queen Marie Antoinette and the Dauphin were given a part of the garden for her private use, first at the west end of the Promenade Bord-d'eaux, then at the edge of the Place Lous XV. After the King's failed attempt to escape France, the surveillance of the family was increased. The royal family was allowed to promenade in the park on the evening of September 18, 1791, during the festival organized to celebrate the new French Constitution, when the alleys of the park were illuminated with pyramids and rows of lanterns. The garden was also used for revolutionary holidays and festivals.

Why You Should Visit:
It's free, you can lounge in green chairs, have an ice cream or a drink, people watch and enjoy some calm before entering the nearby Louvre or resuming your stroll down the Champs-Élysées.
From the pond near Place de la Concorde, you can see the Eiffel Tower and also a lot of beautiful bird life.

Tip:
Don't just stay in just one place – explore a variety of views and spots, as each provides a different perspective!

Opening Hours:
Daily: 7am-9pm
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Place de la Concorde

5) Place de la Concorde (must see)

The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 8.64 hectares (21.3 acres) in area, it is the largest square in the French capital. It is located in the city's 8th arrondissement, at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées. The Place was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel in 1755 as a moat-skirted octagon between the Champs-Élysées to the west and the Tuileries Garden to the east. Decorated with statues and fountains, the area was named Place Louis XV to honor the king at that time. The square showcased an equestrian statue of the king, which was torn down during the French Revolution and the area renamed "Place de la Révolution". The new revolutionary government erected the guillotine in the square, and the first notable to be executed at the Place de la Révolution was King Louis XVI, on January 21, 1793. Other important figures guillotined on the site, often in front of cheering crowds, were Queen Marie Antoinette, Princess Élisabeth of France, Charlotte Corday, Madame du Barry, Georges Danton, Camille Desmoulins, Antoine Lavoisier, Maximilien Robespierre, Louis de Saint-Just, and Olympe de Gouge. The guillotine was most active during the "Reign of Terror", in the summer of 1794, when in a single month more than 1,300 people were executed. A year later, when the revolution was taking a more moderate course, the guillotine was removed from the square.

Why You Should Visit:
Great place for photos and for taking a stroll; centrally located so you can fan out from here to just about any place in Paris.

Tip:
In the square, there is a big Ferris wheel, which offers breathtaking views over Seine river, Louvre Museum, Jardin des Tuileries, Champs-Élysées, Arc de Triomphe, Eiffel Tower... This wheel turns three times more than the London Eye and costs much less!
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Assemblée Nationale

6) Assemblée Nationale

Assemblée Nationale, the lower chamber of the French parliament, is housed in the building originally known as Palais Bourbon (the Bourbon Palace). Its construction started in 1722 under the supervision of Italian architect, Lorenzo Giardini, to a design by himself and Hardouin Mansart. After Giardini's death in 1724, Jacques Gabriel took over the project and completed it in 1728. The name of the palace refers to the Royal house of Bourbon, who were ousted by the republicans during the French Revolution. The Palais Bourbon was renovated and enlarged in 1765. In 1768, the adjoining Hôtel de Lassay was also embraced into the complex. The latter was declared a national property during the French Revolution. At that time, the National Assembly, which existed from June 17 until July 9, 1789, was a transitional body between the Estates General and the National Constituent Assembly.

Between 1804 and 1807, Napoleon Bonaparte added to the palace a colonnaded front in a bid to mirror the Madeleine temple on the opposite bank of the Seine. Since 1830, the Palais Bourbon has been the seat of the Assemblée Nationale. If you want to visit the building, you must arrange an advance reservation.
Sight description based on wikipedia
7
Les Invalides

7) Les Invalides (must see)

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hôtel National des Invalides, is a group of buildings in Paris containing museums and monuments relating to the military history of France. It was originally built as a hospital and retirement home for aged and unwell war veterans. The complex had fifteen courtyards, with the largest – Cour d’honneur ("Court of Honor") – reserved for military parades. Completed in 1676, the complex once housed up to 4,000 war veterans. Some very important war heroes of France, including Napoleon Bonaparte, are buried here. A veteran’s chapel, Église Saint-Louis des Invalides, was built in 1679. Libéral Bruant, the architect of the Hôtel des Invalides, designed the church, and Jules Hardouin Mansart oversaw its construction.

After the completion of the veteran’s chapel, Mansart was asked by Louis XIV to build another, detached, centrally-located (so as to demonstrate its supremacy) royal chapel. The most striking feature of this chapel is a 107-meter dome, inspired by St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. The interior of the dome, painted in Baroque style, creates an illusion of space if looked at from below. The chapel took 27 years to build and is a stunning piece of French Baroque architecture. The Hôtel des Invalides is currently home to three museums, namely: The Musee de l’Armee, The Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée de l'Ordre de la Libération. The former is a large museum recounting military history from the early Middle Ages to the Second World War. It features weapons, uniforms, maps, etc., not only from the western world but also from Oriental countries like Turkey, China, Japan, India.

The Musée des Plans-Reliefs (the Relief Maps Museum) displays detailed scale models of French fortresses and fortified cities from the 17th century. The Musée de l'Ordre de la Libération documents France's liberation movement during World War II. Les Invalides is a place well worth visiting. Please note that you will need more than a day to appreciate it in its entirety.

Why You Should Visit:
From Napoleon's campaigns to the world wars, it is all here for you to see. The exhibits cover not just the military aspects of the wars, but also their economic, social and political aspects, their causes and the aftermath. Then, to top it all off, there is Napoleon's tomb. Unmissable and really grand!

Tip:
There is a café on site run by the famous patisserie Angelina's, so go and have some tea and cake for a nice break... :)

Opening Hours:
Daily: 10am-6pm
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Paris, France

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Create Your Own Walk in Paris

Creating your own self-guided walk in Paris is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour II

Louvre (1st Arr) Walking Tour II

This is part 2 of the 1st arrondissement tour of Paris exploring one of the smallest and oldest districts of the French capital, home to some of Paris's major landmarks, as well as business and administration offices . This itinerary includes Pavillon de Flore, Tuileries Gardens, Musée de l'Orangerie and many other prominent sights.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.6 km
Top Paris Museums

Top Paris Museums

The following tour comprises a few great museums situated along the Seine. As France has a rich historic past and a vast cultural background, there are a lot of museums exhibiting collections that prove that. You can visit some of them by taking the suggested walking tour presented below.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.5 km
City Center Nightlife

City Center Nightlife

A haven for the arts in Europe, with its influence felt worldwide, Paris boasts a steady stream of visitors to its fine city. After dark, guests to the City of Light can enjoy a multitude of great nightlife establishments that is sure to appeal to anyone looking for a hot night on the town. Whether its live DJs spinning intense electronic beats or a live acoustic jazz band you’re looking for Paris has it all. Take this City Center Nightlife Tour and explore the heart of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th arrondissements at night.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.8 km
Opera-Elysees Souvenir Shops

Opera-Elysees Souvenir Shops

It would be a pity to leave Paris without having explored its specialty shops and bringing home something truly original. We've compiled a list of gifts and souvenirs, which are unique to Paris, that a visitor might like to purchase to reflect their visit.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.9 km
Religious Sights Walking Tour

Religious Sights Walking Tour

Paris is one of the cities that can fairly be considered a religious destination because of the number of churches that one is able to visit here. Reports show that, for instance, Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, recorded 13.65 million visits in 2006, and the number is increasing every year. This is a tour that includes some of the most beautiful Christian relics located in the center of Paris - the Latin Quarter.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.9 km
Bourse-Opera Attractions Walking Tour

Bourse-Opera Attractions Walking Tour

Located on the right bank of the River Seine, the 2nd arrondissement, together with the adjacent 8th and 9th arrondissements, hosts an important business district, centred on the Paris Opéra. The area contains the former Paris Bourse (stock exchange), the Garnier Opera House and the famous Fragonard Perfume Museum.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 2.8 km

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