Waikiki Beach Walk in Honolulu, Honolulu

Waikiki or Waikiki Beach is a beachfront area of Honolulu famed for its long rolling ocean break, ideal for boarding and surfing. Waikiki is also home to public places, such as Kapiolani Park, high-end resort hotels (Royal Hawaiian), and abundance of luxury brand stores concentrated on Kalakaua Avenue, the neighborhood's main thoroughfare. Once the playground of Hawaiian aristocracy, today Waikiki greets visitors from all walks of life. Take this self-guided walk and enjoy the delights of Waikiki Beach in a true Aloha spirit!
You can follow this self-guided walking tour to explore the attractions listed below. How it works: download the app "GPSmyCity: Walks in 1K+ Cities" from iTunes App Store or Google Play to your mobile phone or tablet. The app turns your mobile device into a personal tour guide and its built-in GPS navigation functions guide you from one tour stop to next. The app works offline, so no data plan is needed when traveling abroad.

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Waikiki Beach Walk in Honolulu Map

Guide Name: Waikiki Beach Walk in Honolulu
Guide Location: USA » Honolulu (See other walking tours in Honolulu)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 5
Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.1 km
Author: helenp
1
Waikiki Aquarium

1) Waikiki Aquarium (must see)

The Waikiki Aquarium is the third oldest public aquarium in all of the U.S. Built next to a living coral reef on the Waikiki shoreline, it is home to more than 3,500 organisms of 490 species of marine plants and animals. Each year, over 330,000 people visit, and over 30,000 schoolchildren participate in the Aquarium's education activities and programs.

Interestingly, the Aquarium was created in 1904 by the Honolulu Rapid Transit Authority. They hoped that having an aquarium at the end of the trolley line would help entice more people to ride it.

The Waikiki Aquarium was the first place in the world to maintain and captive-breed the chambered nautilus. It also developed living coral displays as early as the mid-1970s, which are notoriously difficult to maintain in captivity. Famous biologist, David Starr Jordan, claimed that the Waikiki Aquarium had the best collection of fishes in the world. There are vibrantly colored fish and corals here that are found nowhere else in the world, and the Waikiki Aquarium promises to be home to more variety than will be found in the waters off Waikiki.

Why You Should Visit:
While it may be smaller than other aquariums, the layout is nice, there's plenty to see, and the staff is very helpful and nice.
Recommended as a nice simple thing to do; a comfortable, relaxed stroll. You can see everything within an hour.
AC on the inside; hands-on experience on the outside, plus viewing of seals and some places to picnic.

Tip:
If you are a student, bring your student ID for a discount.

Opening Hours:
Daily: 9am-4:30pm (facility closes at 5pm)
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Waikiki Beach Pier

2) Waikiki Beach Pier (must see)

Waikiki Beach is a narrow stripe of sand that stretches from Hilton Hawaiian Village to Diamond Head. A few miles long, it is one of the best-known beaches in the entire world, due to its clear and safe water. It is visited by a large number of swimmers and surfers every year. This Pier represents a perfect place for looking out at the incredible blue Pacific, especially at sunset or sunrise. Watch out for rainbows, which are commonly seen in Hawaii.

Tip:
If you're looking for a less crowded beach to have more room for yourself, this is where you'll find it.
3
Kapiolani Park

3) Kapiolani Park (must see)

Named for Queen Kapiolani, the consort of King David Kalakaua, this is Hawaii's largest, oldest public park.

Queen Kapiolani lived between 1834-99. She was named for her great-aunt, High Chiefess Kapiolani, who made a dramatic display of her conversion to Christianity and defied the volcano goddess, Pele. Queen Kapiolani traveled to London for Queen Victoria's 50th Jubilee, along with Princess Liliuokalani. She also established the Kapiolani Maternity Home, where mothers and their newborn babies could receive post-natal medical care. After the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, she moved to her home in Waikiki, where she died at age 64.

Kapiolani Park was made a park because the land was largely unsuitable for anything else. Archibald Cleghorn, a Scotsman who married into Hawaiian royalty, designed the park's landscaping and plantings. After the royal family was overthrown, the park was given to the Republic of Hawaii. Legally, it was decreed that the park be permanently set aside as a public park, with no part of it going up for sale or lease, and no entrance fees. The park is home to the Honolulu Zoo and Waikiki Shell, tennis and basketball courts; soccer, baseball, lacrosse, and rugby fields; an archery range; and a bandstand.

Why You Should Visit:
On one hand, it is clean, quiet and peaceful – full of beautiful flowering shrubs, trees, and gorgeous birds.
On the other hand, it also is the site of many festivals, craft fairs, art sports, art shows and music events.

Tip:
Check the schedule when you arrive so as not to miss some free entertainment and local flare. And make sure you have your sunscreen with you!

Opening Hours:
Daily: 5am-12am
4
Honolulu Zoo

4) Honolulu Zoo (must see)

The Honolulu Zoo has the distinction of being the only zoo in the entire United States to be established with money from a sovereign monarch. It is located on three hundred acres of Kapiolani Park, named for Queen Kapiolani.

The Park was originally established by King David Kalakaua, the Queen's husband. The natural ponds and marshes in the swampy area were cleaned up and beautified, and the park was opened in 1877. In 1914, after the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the City & County of Honolulu named Ben Hollinger as its new Administrator of Parks and Recreation. Now in charge of Kapiolani Park, Hollinger began collecting animals to showcase, including a monkey, lion cubs, and a honey bear. When a steamship arrived in Honolulu Harbor with a live elephant on board, Hollinger begged the City & County of Honolulu to buy the animal for the park. Once the elephant, “Daisy,” was purchased, Honolulu finally had a zoo.

During the Depression, the Zoo began to fall into disrepair as few people were able to afford the luxury of visiting it. In the 1990s, the Honolulu Zoo experienced a resurgence of enthusiasm, when its exhibits were redesigned to more closely mimic their animals' natural habitats. Today, the Honolulu Zoo has over 1,230 animals and sees over 600,000 visitors every year.

Why You Should Visit:
Many cool birds of all different varieties, and the most playful, acrobatic gibbons you'll ever see!
The layout is linear enough that you don't need to constantly check the map, but twisty and windy enough that you feel like you're on an adventure.

Tip:
Best going early in the morning, when it's cooler in the afternoon, or in the cooler months, as the animals like to stay in the shade.
Alternately, if you have a chance, do a night trip when available – it's a very different experience with the nocturnal animals up and about.

Opening Hours:
Daily: 9am-4:30pm
5
Royal Hawaiian Hotel

5) Royal Hawaiian Hotel

The Royal Hawaiian Hotel was one of the first hotels established in Waikiki, in 1927. When steam travel to Hawaii became more effective, many of America's wealthiest families went to visit the island. Captain William Matson, of the Matson Navigation Company, realized that they needed a suitably luxurious place to stay. So, he put forth the idea of creating a hotel in Honolulu to accommodate his wealthy passengers. At first, he purchased the Moana mansion and converted it into a hotel. When it was successful, he went on to build the Royal Hawaiian Hotel.

The Royal Hawaiian took roughly a year and a half to build, cost approximately $4 million USD, and was handled by architects Warren and Wetmore (designers of the New York Biltmore Hotel, Asbury Park Convention Hall, and Atlantic City Ritz-Carlton). It is six stories tall, and was decorated in the Spanish and Moorish styles popular during the 20s. Similarly, the hotel's bright pink color comes from the pink decorating craze during the era in which it was built. As soon as the doors opened in 1927, the hotel was wildly successful. Visitors included statesmen, movie stars, Princess Abigail Kawananakoa, and Olympic medalist Duke Kahanamoku.
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Honolulu, Hawaii

Create Your Own Walk in Honolulu

Create Your Own Walk in Honolulu

Creating your own self-guided walk in Honolulu is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
The Capitol District Tour in Honolulu

The Capitol District Tour in Honolulu

The Capitol District represents a historic area in downtown Honolulu. This civic center includes the biggest majority of governmental buildings at federal, state and city levels. The district is situated among Richards Street, Ward Avenue, Vineyard Boulevard and Nimitz Highway. Some of the largest buildings in the city are located here. Take this walking tour and enjoy the treasures of historic Honolulu.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.4 km
Business District Self-Guided Tour in Honolulu

Business District Self-Guided Tour in Honolulu

The Central Business District is situated in Honolulu's downtown, between Bishop Street and Fort Street Mall. This area holds most of the subsidiaries of local companies. Also, it's Honolulu's skyscraper district. You can see popular sites, such as Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew and First Hawaiian Center. We invite you to take this self-guided tour and admire the Business District of Honolulu.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 0.6 km
Cultural Tour of Honolulu

Cultural Tour of Honolulu

From ancient times, the cultural life of Honolulu has been diverse due to numerous influences. The Hawaiian islands are inhabited by more than seven ethnic groups. Nowadays, Honolulu is full of museums, art galleries and theaters that represent the 200-year history of the island. We invite you to discover the most popular cultural spots in Honolulu on this self-guided tour.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.0 km
Honolulu's Harbor and Coastline Tour

Honolulu's Harbor and Coastline Tour

Honolulu's Harbor is the main historic seaport of Hawaii. It is called Kulolia or Ke Awa O Kou, by native Hawaiians. It is situated on Mamala Bay and was the area that contributed most to the urbanization of the island. This self-guided tour will take you all the way down from Honolulu's Harbor to the Ala Moana Beach, and along Honolulu's beautiful coastline.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.2 km
Diamond Head Volcano Tour

Diamond Head Volcano Tour

Diamond Head Volcano is perhaps one of the best-known attractions on the island of Oahu. The volcano's rugged cone is seen from almost every part of the island. However, at its base, along the coastal line, are situated a couple of other spectacular sights. Take this walking tour to admire one of the most ancient treasures of Hawaii - Diamond Head.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 6.0 km
Pearl Harbor Tour

Pearl Harbor Tour

Pearl Harbor, a US deep-water naval base in Honolulu, made history in 1941 when came under attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service prompting the United States' entering World War II. Since 1964, Pearl Harbor has been declared a National Historic Landmark, featuring a number of military objects and installations turned-monuments. This self-guided tour invites you to pay tribute to the fallen heroes and to learn more about those days at Pearl Harbor.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 7.0 km

Useful Travel Guides for Planning Your Trip


16 Hawaiian Products To Bring Home from Honolulu

16 Hawaiian Products To Bring Home from Honolulu

Pineapples, surfing, flower garlands and colorful shirts are the most distinct things coming to mind in association with Hawaii. Still, when it's time to go leisurely-pleasurely in the remotest part of the United States, it is good to know what is there exactly worth picking up in Honolulu, as...

Tips for Exploring City on Foot at Your Own Pace

Whether you are in Honolulu for a quick stopover or have a few days to see the city in more detail, exploring it on foot, at your own pace, is definitely the way to go. Here are some tips for you to save money, see the best Honolulu has to offer, take good care of your feet while walking, and keep your mobile device – your ultimate "work horse" on this trip - well fed and safe.

Taking Care of Your Feet


To ensure ultimate satisfaction from a day of walking around the city as big as Honolulu, it is imperative to take good care of your feet so as to avoid unpleasant things like blisters, cold or overheated soles, itchy, irritated or otherwise damaged (cracked) skin, etc. Luckily, these days there is no shortage of remedies to address (and, ideally, to prevent) these and other potential problems with feet. Among them: Compression Socks, Rechargeable Battery-Powered Thermo Socks for Cold Weather, Foot Repair Cream, Deodorant Powder, Shoes UV Sterilizer, and many more that you may wish to find a place in your travel kit for.

Travel Gadgets for Your Mobile Device


Your mobile phone or tablet will be your work horse on a self-guided walk. They offer tour map, guide you from one attraction to another, and provide informative background for the sights you wish to visit. Therefore it is absolutely essential to plan against unexpected power outages in the wrong place at the wrong time, much as to ensure the safety of your device.

For these and other contingencies, here's the list of useful appliances: Portable Charger/External Battery Pack, Worldwide Travel Charger Adapter, Power Converter for International Travel Adapter, and Mobile Device Leash.