Historic Sites Tour of Salt Lake City (Self Guided), Salt Lake City

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has played a strong role in the history of Salt Lake City. The city is the headquarters of the church, and many prominent buildings and landmarks relate directly to the church. Take this tour to visit some of Salt Lake City's interesting historic sites.
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Historic Sites Tour of Salt Lake City Map

Guide Name: Historic Sites Tour of Salt Lake City
Guide Location: USA » Salt Lake City (See other walking tours in Salt Lake City)
Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing)
# of Attractions: 10
Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 4.7 Km or 2.9 Miles
Author: tamara
1
Devereaux Mansion

1) Devereaux Mansion

The Devereaux House in Salt Lake City, also known as the Staines-Jennings Mansion, was built in 1857. It was designed by William Paul. It was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1971. The grand house and its large yard have been preserved in the middle of the city without even resorting to a perimeter fence, so the yard has the appearance of a park. The house is surrounded by larger and newer structures including EnergySolutions Arena, the Triad Center, and the Salt Lake City Union Pacific Station and the surrounding Gateway District development.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
2
Salt Lake Temple

2) Salt Lake Temple (must see)

Salt Lake Temple is the largest and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Salt Lake Temple is the centerpiece of the 10-acre Temple Square in Salt Lake City. Although there are no public tours inside the temple (because it is considered sacred by the church and its members), the temple grounds are open to the public and are a popular tourist attraction. Due to its location at LDS Church headquarters and its historical significance, it is visited by Latter-day Saints from many parts of the world. The temple is intended to evoke the Temple of Solomon at Jerusalem. It is oriented towards Jerusalem, and the large basin used as a baptismal font is mounted on the backs of twelve oxen as was the brazen sea in Solomon's Temple. The temple site was dedicated on February 14, 1853. President Woodruff dedicated the temple on April 6, 1893, exactly forty years after the cornerstone was laid.
Sight description based on wikipedia
3
Alfred McCune Home

3) Alfred McCune Home

The Alfred McCune Home is one of the turn-of-the-century mansions on Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City. Built for Alfred W. McCune on the inclined south side of Capitol Hill at the northeast corner of 200 North and Main Street, the mansion has 21 rooms and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The house was built in 1900. McCune wanted his home to be an extravagant display, and to these ends he financed a two-year tour of America and Europe for his architect S. C. Dallas to study designs and techniques. The design chosen was a Gothic revival plan with East Asian influences. Alfred W. McCune and his wife Elizabeth lived in the home until 1920. Prior to moving to Los Angeles, they donated it to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with the intent that it be used as an official residence for President Heber J. Grant.
Sight description based on wikipedia
4
Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home

4) Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home

The Woodruff-Riter-Stewart Home is a mansion on Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City. Originally built for Edward D. Woodruff, a Union Pacific doctor who also had a successful laundry business, the home was designed by architects Headlund and Wood and was finished in 1906. The home is an example of Renaissance architecture. Originally, the house had an interior like a traditional English home with stained glass, mahogany paneling, leather coverings, and mural-adorned walls. However, subsequent owners painted over all of the original interior. Likewise, the original red brick of the house was painted white for a time. Woodruff lived in the house his entire life, and it was inherited by his daughter Leslie and her husband, General Franklin Riter, a noted local citizen.
Sight description based on wikipedia
5
Council Hall

5) Council Hall (must see)

The Salt Lake City Council Hall is currently home to offices of the Utah Office of Tourism and The Utah Film Commission and is located on Capitol Hill. The building is historically important as the Old Salt Lake City Hall or just Old City Hall from 1866 to 1894. Council Hall was originally Salt Lake City Hall, built to replace an older, smaller city hall completed just six years earlier. This small city hall was almost immediately inadequate for the growing city, so planning work on a new City Hall began by 1863.

Ground for the new hall was broken on February 8, 1864 under the direction of the prolific Salt Lake City architect William H. Folsom. Sandstone for the structure was delivered from Red Butte Canyon on Utah's first chartered railroad. In January 1866, City Hall was dedicated by George Q. Cannon, a prominent LDS leader.

Six rooms on the first floor housed the mayor's office and other city departments. From 1866 till 1894, the City Hall was the seat of Salt Lake City Government and meeting place for the Utah Territorial legislature. The Rose Room on the second floor served both as a general courtroom and the legislative floor. After 1894 the city used the Hall as police headquarters until 1915.

To make way for a federal office building downtown, the old City Hall was relocated to Capitol Hill in 1961. Restoration was done under the direction of architect Edward O. Anderson, and was mostly finished by 1962. The building was renamed "Council Hall."

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
6
Memory Grove Park

6) Memory Grove Park (must see)

Memory Grove Park sits at the base of City Creek Canyon. The grove contains memorials to the nation's war veterans. The trail on the west side of the grove leads to the State Capitol Building. It is a peaceful place where you can rest, meditate or enjoy a walk. Here you will find beautiful natural views, monuments and an impressive variety of plants and trees.
7
Beehive House

7) Beehive House (must see)

The Beehive House is one of two official residences of Brigham Young, an early leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons). The Beehive House gets its name from the Beehive sculpture atop the house. It was designed by Young's brother-in-law and architect of the Salt Lake Temple, Truman O. Angell, who later designed Young's other residence, the Lion House. The Beehive house was constructed in 1854, two years before the Lion House. The Lion House is adjacent to the Beehive House, and both homes are one block east of the Salt Lake Temple and Temple Square. It is constructed of adobe and sandstone. Young was a polygamist, and the Beehive House was designed to accommodate him and his wives and children. Under church ownership, the Beehive House, at 67 E. South Temple, was restored in 1960. It is now a historic house museum with period furnishings depicting the Young family's life in the mid-1800s.
Sight description based on wikipedia
8
Old Hansen Planetarium

8) Old Hansen Planetarium

The Old Hansen Planetarium at 15 South State Street in Salt Lake City has served many functions throughout its history. Originally built in 1904 as the Salt Lake City Public Library, the building was renovated in 1965 to become the Hansen Planetarium. After the planetarium closed and was replaced by the Clark Planetarium in 2003, the building was remodeled into the O.C. Tanner Company Headquarters, which opened in 2009. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

The first public library in Salt Lake City opened in 1898 and was located in the top floor of the Salt Lake City and County Building. After the library quickly outgrew the venue, the city began looking for a location to build a new library. The new library opened in 1905 with librarian Joanna Sprague, for whom the Sprague branch of the Salt Lake City Public Library system, also listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is now named. The building would continue to serve as the main branch library until October 1964.

After the new library was constructed in 1964, Gail Plummer, professor of speech and drama at the University of Utah and chairman of the Salt Lake City Library board, expressed interest in converting the old library into a planetarium.After Mrs. Hansen's death the building was renamed the Mr. and Mrs. George T. Hansen Planetarium, Space Science Library and Museum in honor of the couple.The Hansen Planetarium continued operation until April 2003, when it outgrew the building and was replaced by the Clark Planetarium in the Gateway District.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
9
Cathedral of the Madeleine

9) Cathedral of the Madeleine (must see)

The Cathedral of the Madeleine is a Roman Catholic church in Salt Lake City. It was completed in 1909, and currently serves as the cathedral, or mother church, of the Diocese of Salt Lake City. The cathedral was built under the direction of Lawrence Scanlan, first bishop of Salt Lake. It was designed by architects Carl M. Neuhausen and Bernard O. Mecklenburg. The outside is predominantly a Neo-Romanesque design, while the inside tends more toward the Neo-Gothic. Construction began in 1900 and was completed in 1909.

The interior of the cathedral was created under the direction of Joseph S. Glass, the second bishop of Salt Lake. John Theodore Comes, one of the preeminent architects in the country, decorated the interior of the cathedral. His plans for the interior were largely based upon the Spanish Gothic style. The colorful murals and polychrome were added at this time, as were the ornate shrines.

In the 1970s, the exterior of the building was restored, and between 1991 and 1993, the interior of the Cathedral was renovated and restored under Bishop William K. Weigand. This included changes to the liturgical elements of the cathedral to bring them into conformity with certain widespread changes in liturgical practice that developed after the Second Vatican Council. This included building a new altar, moving the bishop's chair, providing a separate chapel for the Blessed Sacrament, and adding a more ample baptismal font.

"(The above description is based on Wikipedia under Creative Common License)"
Sight description based on wikipedia
10
Utah Governor's Mansion

10) Utah Governor's Mansion (must see)

The Utah Governor's Mansion is the official residence of the governor of Utah and his family. It is located at 603 E. South Temple Street. Built in 1902 by United States Senator and prominent mining magnate Thomas Kearns, the house was designed by notable Utah architect Carl M. Neuhausen, who also designed the Cathedral of the Madeleine. In February 1937 Jennie Judge Kearns donated the Kearns Mansion to the state on the condition that it serve as the governor's residence.
Sight description based on wikipedia

Walking Tours in Salt Lake City, Utah

Create Your Own Walk in Salt Lake City

Create Your Own Walk in Salt Lake City

Creating your own self-guided walk in Salt Lake City is easy and fun. Choose the city attractions that you want to see and a walk route map will be created just for you. You can even set your hotel as the start point of the walk.
Tour of Salt Lake City's Downtown

Tour of Salt Lake City's Downtown

Salt Lake City has a bounty of artistic and cultural landmarks and the city continues to add more every year. This tour will help you enjoy the modern architectural sights in downtown Salt Lake City, including some of the city's first skyscrapers.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.5 km
Salt Lake City Temple Square Tour

Salt Lake City Temple Square Tour

Salt Lake City is famous for its ties to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), also known as the Mormon Church. This tour around Temple Square will lead you to the Church's headquarters, the breathtaking Salt Lake City Temple and some beautiful, historic homes.

Tour Duration: 1 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 1.1 km
Shopping Tour of Salt Lake City

Shopping Tour of Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City has something to please every shopper. Here you can purchase antiques, wine, jewelry, art and much more! Take this tour to visit the best shops in Salt Lake City, and find yourself a fabulous souvenir.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 5.3 km
Tour of Salt Lake City's North Downtown

Tour of Salt Lake City's North Downtown

Salt Lake City has a rich religious and cultural heritage. Most of the city's top attractions are centrally located downtown. Take this tour to enjoy the most interesting landmarks found in Salt Lake City's North Downtown area.

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.5 km
Places of Worship Tour of Salt Lake City

Places of Worship Tour of Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is home to the headquarters of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and so has many Mormon religious buildings. However, many other religious denominations are represented in Salt Lake City. Take this tour to visit Salt Lake City's beautiful and varied places of worship.

Tour Duration: 3 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 6.4 km
Children's Entertainment Tour of Salt Lake City

Children's Entertainment Tour of Salt Lake City

In addition to Salt Lake City's historic and cultural landmarks, there are many attractions that will entertain and delight your children. Visit the city's museums, theaters and parks, and enjoy some family fun time. Take this tour to visit the best kid-friendly attractions in Salt Lake City!

Tour Duration: 2 hour(s)
Travel Distance: 3.1 km